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Journeyman's Journal

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This is a journal of the art of woodworking by hand
Updated: 1 hour 42 min ago

Project-Shipwrecked Pen Box

Tue, 12/12/2017 - 2:06pm

My friend William’s 50th was coming up, and he was also celebrating his graduation. Huh, graduate at 50? Yup. He has several degrees and among them masters. Now he can add a law degree to that list.

So, as we all do I “Binged” the net for inspiration. I looked for boxes and a judges hammer and Gavel. I wish I had of taken photos of the hammer, next time when I go around I’ll take it and post it on Instagram. Anyway, I stumbled upon none other than the wood whisperer’s jewellery box. He took this design from someone else while he was still learning the craft. I thought this is great and settled on that. I didn’t make too many changes as I was pretty happy with it.

I have plenty of scrap lying around as I’ve recently become a hoarder of wood due to increasing costs. I used Silky Oak for the lid and base and American Black Walnut for the sides. This Walnut hasn’t been Kiln dried properly and is the biggest SOB to work with. But since I have it and paid through my backside for it, I might as well use it despite all the difficulties of working with it.

The box measures 9 1/2″ x 3 1/2″. The lid’s thickness ranges from 3/4” to 1″ and this is dependant on whether you want a curved lid or flat. The sides of the box are mortised and the inside of the base routed or in this case chopped out.

Mark used machinery to make his box while I, as always, will only use hand tools. I had to make only one slight adjustment to make up for any hand inaccuracies. Mark would use a table saw to cut a large dado where the item would rest and he would then clean up the bottom with a straight bit router. This meant that the floor of the dado would be flush with the tenon. So, what I did after sawing the sides and chopping out the bulk of the waste was to stop short about 1/16 above the tenon to create a small shoulder with my router plane. As long as the shoulders are crisp and square this would eliminate any unsightly gaps that would have been sticking out like a saw thumb had I followed Mark’s machine methods.

Mark used barrel hinges I had none and used in its stead brass 1/8″ rods I have plenty of and inserted them both in either side.

I finished the box off with Antique Oil, I’ve become very fond of this oil recently.   All in all I enjoyed the project thoroughly and am currently making more. One for my mum, my little one, then my niece, my brother in law, friends and so forth.

So in the few past days I’ve taken an interest in box making. You don’t need a lot of materials on hand to work with, which means it’s not cost prohibitive. You work with various exotic pieces learning and understanding the temperament of each species. You also don’t need a lot of tools nor shop space to make boxes. You most definitely don’t need machinery to make them either.  However, besides all those materialistic things, for me the biggest draw I have towards them is the challenge. You may look at a box and say wow that looks beautiful and simple to make, but looks are deceiving. The challenge is, there is high levels of accuracy involved, one mistake and that’s basically it, it’s over, you’ve ruined your box.  The pieces are small, so some clamping can be challenging. Your tools must be super sharp as it should be with any project, but in this case you need to keep them super sharp, so there is no mishaps when working with your joinery.

I think making boxes is a teacher and a test of skill. Without a doubt you will learn to hone them to much higher levels. Imagine taking those newly honed skills on every project irrespective of what the project size is. Imagine this new high level of accuracy and insane cleanliness you have developed in your work becomes second nature and all this gained just from making boxes.  I think I will explore this some more. This may be the training I have been looking for.

 


Categories: Hand Tools

The t shirts have arrived

Mon, 12/11/2017 - 3:33am

I came home from work and was welcomed by a nice surprise. The t shirts have arrived and they turned out pretty good. The ink didn’t run and they feel comfortable to wear.

I know with any printed shirts you cannot put an iron over the label or they will simply melt off.

All in all I’m pretty happy with them. Except for the price of the black shirt. I don’t know why they charge extra for the black.

If anyone would like one, the price for the white is AU$29.90 plus shipping.

The black AU$49.90 plus shipping.

If I get 30 orders then I can order in bulk from another printing company and price it the same as the white.

I haven’t set the blog up for e commerce so you will need to shoot me an email with your colour choice, name and full address and I’ll send you an invoice via PayPal. Once it’s been paid I’ll place an order with the printing company and have it shipped out to you as soon as it arrives.


Categories: Hand Tools

A New Discovery!

Sun, 12/10/2017 - 1:00pm

A small tin of Prooftint Stain sprung a leak and coloured a portion of my shelf, awe how considerate. The little bugger over the years slowly ate its way through the bottom of the can. Not really sure how though as it’s not possible, but the evidence is in the pudding.

As I was cleaning and cursing away, you know the usual shop talk with yourself, I noticed this beautiful brass or bronze like patina on another tin the stain leaked on.

Elm-can

Once more poor photographic skills have let me down, I wish you could see what I see. It reminds of the old infill planes Bill Carter still makes by hand.  BTW, it was Elm that leaked. I did try another stain on another can to see if I could replicate it but no go.  I guess a particular metal type matter, but I’m unsure about this. What type of metal is the can made of? Probably tin, but I’m not a metallurgist to say for sure. Either way it works and looks great. You could probably do this to screws to give it an antique look.  Just so you know that methylated spirits will wash 90% of it off. But I think a little bit of lacquer will protect it for many years.


Categories: Hand Tools

Exotic Woods to Try with Your Next Project

Sat, 12/09/2017 - 4:16pm

I received an email this morning randomly from Lord knows who. The Woodworking forum advertised doesn’t appear in the search list. The business address advertised also is non existent, so I’m just taking it as spam.  However, it’s not useless information and I thought I’d share it with you. I’ve also provided a link to a website I discovered this morning who sells exotic species in the US.  I thought Australia was the only country with high priced timber, I guess the US has decided to follow our poor example.

unnamed

Pine, oak, and maple are perfectly serviceable woods for most woodworking projects, but sometimes you want to create something a little special. Even the most basic design can be transformed into high-end pieces with the right kind of wood.

Most exotic woods are harder and denser than basic pine or maple and they contain more natural oils, which allows you to create beautiful glassy finishes on most exotics. Exotic woods are generally heavier than basic woods and can be much pricier, but they make great choices for smaller pieces and accent or inlay work. One thing to keep in mind while working with exotic woods is that the dust from sanding many of them can be hazardous to your health. It can cause rashes to your skin or problems when inhaled, so wear protective clothing and eyewear when working with it.

Brazil Nut Wood

Made from the tree that produces the food of the same name, Brazil nut wood is very dense. Best used for projects such as furniture making, boxes and musical instruments, its beautiful reddish tint is lightly striped with golden orange. The wood is moderately smooth-grained and can take a very high polish, making it a great wood for showpieces.

Asian Satinwood

This exotic hardwood has a deep curl that penetrates through the wood. The reddish-orange color combined with the curl creates a board that looks like it has enclosed flames. Popular in Southeast Asia for floors and cabinets, it’s also a beautiful choice for smaller projects such as pool cues, duck calls or knife handles.

Black Limba

This west African species is a wonderful wood to work with, being slightly less dense than American walnut. The warm brown background has prominent black stripes throughout, making it a striking choice for larger pieces. Use this wood for guitar bodies, fancy boxes or turned pieces.

Monkeypod

Also known as Pacific Koa, Monkeypod wood is an excellent choice for furniture and turned pieces. Warm gold and dark chocolate brown swirl together with black stripes to create a beautiful design. Pacific Koa is light in weight, relatively hard and very strong. It finishes absolutely beautifully, making it the exotic choice for many who love woodturning projects.

Pernambuco

Pernambuco is also known as Brazil wood. This rare, exotic hardwood is burnt reddish brown in color. The name is significant because the burnt red and vivid orange colors of the wood resemble the colors of Brazilian soil. This is a very stiff wood that works well in box making, but its primary use is for instrument bows. You can create a glass-like finish on this wood, making for some absolutely striking projects.

Australian Murray Red River Gum

Truly an extraordinary wood for extraordinary projects. This hard, dense wood ranges in color from creamy white to a brilliant, deep red. It glues and works well, but its figural inclusions are what makes it really special. Black swirls and random shapes show up throughout the pieces and occasionally even a checkerboard design will occur. This wood has a silky smooth grain, giving you the opportunity to craft some very special pieces.

Brazilian Tigerwood

This wood grows on the east coast of Brazil. The color is light gold fading into a red, with dark streaks that resemble a tiger’s stripes. Tigerwood is naturally oily and dense, which means it can take an incredible polish. This wood is great for smaller pieces and fancier applications such as pepper mills, knife handles. inlay work or bowls.

Movingui

A gorgeous wood that’s ideal for stringed instruments as well as smaller pieces. Movingui is so sought-after than most great pieces are cut into veneer, but occasionally you’ll find some sawed into lumber. It has a medium to fine grain and is a soft golden yellow with a darker golden grain that can look like stripes, mottling and even bees’ wings.

Sourcing

The problem with many exotic woods is that they’re rated as vulnerable or endangered. Legitimate dealers collect their wood from naturally dead trees. The sale of exotic woods creates strong feelings on both sides of the issue. Whether you feel uncomfortable dealing in exotic and rare woods or you love the unique features they bring to your projects, you should always support dealers who follow import laws and practice sustainable customs.

Cook Woods-Exotic Species


Categories: Hand Tools

Reading the grain

Thu, 12/07/2017 - 11:18pm

Having the ability to read grain on wood is one of the many most fundamental critical tasks a woodworker should have competency in. Some timbers are easy to read while others are not.  Let’s look at this African Tulip I’m working with to have a better understanding on the subject.

image1

If we look at the board, you’ll see the grain is a cathedral or one could even describe it as a ripple in a pond. It appears to our eyes the grain is pointing from left to right, so if planed from left to right, you’d be planing against the grain or is it.  If we inspect, you’ll notice the grain is layered from right to left so, our planing direction is right to left.

image2

image3

I know it looks deceptive. Another way of reading the grain if it’s difficult to read on the surface is by feel.

image4

Running your finger along the edge of a board in both directions will most of the time give you a clear sign of where the grain is running. Press lightly when you do it and be careful of splinters.

Most grains can be read, but some just can’t and when you run into the one that can’t, set your plane to take a light shaving. If you feel it snag then stop, even with a plane set to take a little more than a 32nd you can still feel your planing with or against the grain.  If it’s tearing on both sides of the board, then hone a higher bevel angle.

The more you work with various species the more you’ll learn what to look out for.

Take care and enjoy your craft

 


Categories: Hand Tools

T-shirt Design

Wed, 12/06/2017 - 6:14am

I’m going to make a few t-shirts for the shop. My wife has thrown out most of shop shirts and I bought some new ones, but none of them are tax deductible and as the magazine’s name is a registered business why not make a few shirts and a mug with its name on it.  It’ll be great to show the world that there are some of us who won’t allow themselves to be replaced by robotics. The world is so eager to move in that direction and of course the sheep will always be lured by the wolves.  But anyhow here are two colours I’m going to order, not to forget the mug, we can’t have work without tea.

I’m not sure what they will cost me as I haven’t yet placed the order, but if you wish to order one shoot me an email and if you agree with whatever the price is plus shipping and I’ll place an order for you.  All proceeds would go towards buying lumber for upcoming project articles.


Categories: Hand Tools

The hypocrisy of a cheapskate woody

Sun, 12/03/2017 - 6:00pm

This is hilarious, please watch it till the end, but it’s also true. This isn’t a Lie Nielsen promotion just try to see the bigger picture.

http://giantcypress.net/post/1487152382/overheard-conversation-at-a-lie-nielsen-hand-tool

 


Categories: Hand Tools

You can’t rush experience

Sat, 12/02/2017 - 7:38pm

I’ve been quiet for a while, enjoying the serenity of the craft. It’s difficult taking photos and then trying to figure out how to put them into words that will be easy to understand.  I know this will fall into place only after several years of continuous writing.

You can’t rush knowledge to gain experience and I was reminded today when I returned to the moulding plane build. I took out the no.4’s I wrote about in Issue III.

I didn’t notice it earlier and I guess that’s the curse of distraction that the body of the round was thicker than a 1/4″. It being thicker, it planed a hollow that was all wonky looking, out of shape.  To fix it all I did was plane down the chamfer on the blindside. Without a chamfer the plane could not reach into the corner of a moulding.

IMG_0544

Now it’s planed to the correct thickness, both planes now mate perfectly together.

IMG_0545

Skill is the final frontier we are trying to reach, but without knowledge you’ll never put it into practice to gain the experience and experience comes only through repetition followed by skill.  This is not an overnight process, it takes years to gain true knowledge, experience and skill.  So if you’re frustrated with joints not being gap free or sawing not perfectly plumb, don’t be. It’s normal and part of the learning process.  Remember, you first crawled before you walked and then finally ran. Give it time and allow nature to run its course. Don’t give up and don’t be like that stingy guy Christopher Schwarz wrote about on his blog. 

Take care. Peace

 


Categories: Hand Tools

Dovetailing Machine of 1890

Fri, 11/17/2017 - 4:57am

The year was 1890 and the first ever dovetailing machine was patented by the Britannia Company, Colchester for £2 2s. It’s a dovetailing jig as we would understand it which is used on a foot powered table saw.

It was an unfortunate year, the beginning of the end of yet one more skill, but in the interest of gaining historical woodworking knowledge we shall read more about it and how it’s used.

A pine board 24”x 18”x 3/8” is clamped at each end on the table saw. A spline fitting the groove in the table saw ensures accurate movement, with a slot exactly in the centre of the two frames when in their places, for the saw to work through as shown in Fig.1.fig1

Fix on the gauge, (Fig.3) which is a piece of wood with slots at intervals, according to the size of dovetails required- upon platform, (Fig.2), of frames, as shown. These gauges are generally fixed upon the lower ledge, but for some work the upper ledge may be more convenient.  These gauges can be easily made by an amateur, or are supplied with the dovetailer.

The appliance in Fig.2 is to be fixed upon the board as shown, so that the saw may run clear when the movable frame is at either end of the segment.fig2Put in the screw through the frame Fig. 2 and screw down so as to allow the frame to move backwards and forward. The frame is to be fixed as shown 2 ¾” from square line of saw. To cut the mortises, place the wood upon the inclined plane, having adjusted the table so that the saw will cut the correct depth. Bring the front edge of the wood up to the end of the gauge, holding the marker in the left hand so that it falls into the various slots s the wood passes up the incline. The positions of the operator, the movable table, the frames, gauges, inclined plane, wood, marker and saw are all very clearly indicated in Fig.1

fig3fig4

When one row has been made, turn the wood round and take the marker in the right hand and follow each cut up the incline until the cuts are completed. To cut the tenons or pins, adjust the saw table so that the saw cuts the required depth. Fix the gauge on the lower ledge of platform, the inner end of gauge forming the distance for the first cut.

Of course, it will be understood that the cuts only are made by the saw. The clearances of the mortises and the wood intervening between the pins must be affected in the usual manner with a chisel. The merit of the entire appliance lies in the presentation of the edges of the wood to the saw in such a manner and in such a position that the saw kerfs, first in one direction and then in the other, are made with such sure and certain regularity of distance and direction, and perfect parallelism, that an operator who is comparatively an unskilled hand can be enabled to perform work which, if done by the hand, must be the outcome of long practice combined with the utmost care in execution.

England has been at the forefront of invention of engineering marvels since their creation of the Industrial revolution in 1830. I’m in midst of writing an article on the industrial revolution and its effect it had and still has on human lives.  All I’m going to add is that this machine or appliance eliminates the need for a skilled dovetailer. I’m sure it would only take two minutes to train anybody to operate it and produce flawless dovetails.

For the sake of skill and of course profits, we have traded something more valuable in fact something priceless; skill.

Something to ponder, we marvel at how skilled they were, but how many of these skills were actual hand work or machine work.  I think it’s safe to bet that our craftsmen in the 18th century were machine free and therefore truly skilled at their jobs.  It would be grossly unfair if I said the opposite about craftsmen in the 19th century, but how many of those dovetails we see in antique furniture of that period were made by hand or by the patented dovetailing machine.


Categories: Hand Tools

How to fix a wonky Auger bit

Wed, 11/08/2017 - 7:18pm

I wish I had of taken a photo of the auger bit prior to the fix, but I didn’t think of writing about it till it was too late.

_DSC1854

Just because it’s an antique or vintage doesn’t mean it’s flawless. This set of Irwin auger bits is pretty good, but far from flawless.  I bought this set years ago and haven’t used them much in all this time.

Anyway, I remembered that I had a bit 3/8″ that wasn’t straight and of course it’s always the one that is used more than others or at least second to the 1/4″. The shaft was bent and pretty much I might add.  Maybe someone dropped it, either way it needs fixing.

On the metal part of my lathe which is now serving as an anvil until my luck runs out, I tapped it straight with a rubber mallet they use in panel beating.  (This mallet is pretty good and will not leave a mark on wood not matter how hard you hammer it.) I would hammer a couple of times and check the bit by eye. Once it looks straight, I would finish it by hammering whilst turning the bit 360°.

_DSC1855

This is the result.

_DSC1856

_DSC1857

I chucked it in the brace and held the bit and brace vertical while slowly turning the bit. No wobble, good news, it’s not a bin job. It’s fixed.

Issue III has finally been released as you all know and there has been a lot of downloads, but zero feedbacks.

Hope this post helps someone.


Categories: Hand Tools

Issue III link now available

Fri, 11/03/2017 - 2:46pm

Guys, I’m really sorry, but wordpress didn’t publish the link.  I set it to auto schedule publish, but I learned now that it needs to be manually linked under the category.

Just in case it disappears here is the download link

Issue III


Categories: Hand Tools

Vol.1 Issue III Out Now

Fri, 11/03/2017 - 7:00am

handwork_issue3_Page_01

In the top right hand corner you will see a tab called “HANDWORK Magazine” Don’t click on it just over your mouse over it and a drop down menu will appear. Choose whichever issue you wish to download.

tut


Categories: Hand Tools

A side rebate plane’s fence, fix solution

Thu, 11/02/2017 - 4:51pm

A side rebate (rabbet) plane widens dado’s (housing) or trench (Europe) and grooves, wow so many names for one joint.   Sometime a dado is a little too tight to accept a shelf or a groove for a drawer bottom needs to be a little wider for a perfect fit, this is where these planes excel.

There are several versions and makers of these planes, I believe Stanley only produced two of the No.79 and the 98 and 99 which Lie Nielsen now produces. 98_99

Then there was Edward Preston, whom Veritas based their design on and not to forget record. When Preston left the tool making scene, Record took over the production of the Preston planes.


Some time ago I began my hunt for a decent no.79 and I found one on eBay. I can’t remember what I paid for it, but they’re stupidly expensive now. The one I found was in near perfect condition. Here are the eBay pictures I downloaded at the time.


Whoever bought it must have thrown it in the toolbox and forgotten about it.  It’s rare to see these planes in such good condition. Well, I was lucky. There is another version of the no.79 you should avoid. They have slotted round screws instead of the thumb screws like I have.

79fence

I suspected at the time that the slots in the screws would wear out through repeated use, so I asked my friend Tony as he has one and he hates it for that reason alone. Tony’s tool chest was featured in Jim Tolpin’s book “The Toolbox Book.” page 28.  He fits over 400 tools in his chest and it weighs in at a whopping 400lb (181.43kg). That’s an entire workshop of tools he can carry to any job site and only taking up a small corner in the back of his pickup.
Let me see anyone do this with modern machinery.

Anyhow, the purpose of this blog was not to go into any detail about different versions of the side rebate planes, but to discuss a manfacturer’s flaw in the fence and the quick solution I came to fixing it.

So even though it’s basically new for a vintage plane, it still had a manufacturing fault. The fence wasn’t 90° to the surface of the plane. This rectification was on my to do list for many months, but I didn’t give it much thought on how to fix it since I don’t have a square metal block, I’ve left as is till this morning.  My day typically begins at 4 am when I’m not working my other job, this is the best part of the day as your mind is fresh with new ideas and it’s peaceful as the world is still asleep. It’s very serene.

I started off with a pair of pliers trying to bend it into shape and all I managed to do was create small teeth marks ruining what was once a pristine surface.

If Stanley did their job right in the first place, I wouldn’t have had to do this.

So, I kept bending it like a moron not realising that I was also creating a hump in the middle.  Now I was frantic and I looked around in desperation for anything that was square that could handle a beating and there she was. My lathe.

I threw a square up against the outside face and no go, so I tried the inside and alas she’s square.

_DSC1849

 

I placed the fence against the metal bar on the lathe and with the hard part of a rubber mallet I struck several light blows across the surface.

_DSC1847
Yes, it worked! The fence is square, but the hump is still there. To fix that I used a normal metal hammer and got rid of the hump.

_DSC1850

_DSC1853
Had I given this proper thought beforehand, I wouldn’t have left teeth marks on a pristine surface. Lucky for me these marks are not sharp where it would mar the work. Surprisingly though they are smooth as a baby’s butt.

Is this a must have tool?

It’s a toughie to answer, yes and no. Yes, when you need one and I have used it more often than not, but it’s not an everyday “usage tool.”  I think it’s one of those tools you tend to forget you have until the day pops up when nothing else will work as the tool you forgot you had.


Categories: Hand Tools

Rabbet Plane Build Split in Half

Thu, 11/02/2017 - 12:36am

I had some free time on my hands, yeah, I know, shock, horror I got free time. I returned to an unfinished project I started a few months ago building a wooden rabbet plane.  I was boring a 1″ hole near the escapement when CRACK the bit split the timber in two.

Rather than chuck the plane away, I glued it back together again with fish glue.  Those cam clamps provide just enough pressure without risking crushing the fibres.  I say that because I reattached it as is without doing disturbing the break. Fortunately for me the break was clean with no missing parts.

rabbet-split

I left the plane oversized in length, width and thickness. When I inserted the iron and wedged it, I noticed the plane bowed ever so slightly.  Maybe when I put the cover on the rabbeted grip, the bow may not return.  I guess I’ll have to wait and see.


Categories: Hand Tools

Issue III release date notice

Sun, 10/29/2017 - 6:03am

handwork_issue3_Page_01

Finally it’s finished, all the articles completed, edited over and over again. This was a big project for me as the moulding planes article was a toughie to write about.  I needed to provide enough description without putting you to sleep and make it easy enough to follow.  I think I have accomplished both and I believe you will be able to make any h&r using a simpler method than the traditional British and American approach.  I have covered many aspects of the build and the reasoning behind the numbering system.

I’m sorry it took so long, but I think you will agree it was worth the wait.

As you can see I’ve also made some minor changes. Hope you like it.

As always I would like to thank Matt McGrane our magazine’s contributing editor. I would be lost without him.

Issue III release date is on Saturday 4th November 2017.

Yes, it is free


Categories: Hand Tools

Liquid Hide Experiment Conclusion

Sun, 10/22/2017 - 8:55pm

The homemade match of liquid was a success after all.

Oh-Success-

This time I did a rubbed joint and left the glue to draw the wood onto each other, another words I let the glue do the clamping.  I let it sit for 12 hours. The glue on the surface was gummy as it should be. It’s a good practice to allow 24hours to cure, but I wanted to see the effectiveness of the homemade batch after 12 hours. The results were the glue won. It held up its end of the bargain doing its job perfectly. As you can see in the picture above the glue line is intact.

Some points to note before I wither away into my shop.

  • Hot Hide will dry hard relatively quickly on the surface, that has been my personal experience.
  • Liquid Hide will remain gummy on the surface for longer than 24hrs because of the urea, but will cure in the joint.
  • You can perform a rubbed joint with HH
  • You cannot perform a rubbed joint with LH (the pieces I used were very thin and even then I couldn’t do a proper rubbed joint)
  • You can glue an edge joint with HH straight off the plane
  • You cannot glue an edge joint with LH straight off the plane, the edge surface must be roughed up with some course grit paper.

I guess the last part is the most important bit of information about LH. The first test I did was a failure as it broke on the glue line without much effort. The reason being the surface was smooth off the plane.  I knew this would happen, but I thought maybe a home batch version would react differently and it didn’t.  I did write about this in Issue III.

The second test I roughed the edge with some 80 grit sandpaper, 120grit would work as well.  Obviously it was a success.

As you can see there are notable differences between Liquid Hide and Hot Hide. It would be better to use Hot hide over Liquid hide, but it’s also comforting to know that if you need that extra open time LH will do the job equally well.

 


Categories: Hand Tools

Make Your Own Liquid Hide – Results

Sat, 10/21/2017 - 7:00am

If you remember my previous post I was making my own batch of liquid hide glue.

The results have turned out better than expected.  Tack time is about 4 mins and I really didn’t get much more from OBG. I ripped,jointed and edge glued the same beech and let it sit for an hour.  An hour is never usually long enough time as no glue can cure within that short time span, but it shocked that I couldn’t break the join.  What’s even more surprising that the glue dried clear! See for yourselves. The join is in the middle.

Beech-And-Hide

Then I edge glued pine and the squeeze out was a light transparent brown colour. When I wiped it off, there’s  no dark colour on the glue joint. Again, see for yourselves.

Pine-And-Hide

Here’s what it looks like in the bottle.

Liquid-Hide-And-Pot

As you can see it looks no different than any liquid hide on the market.

It’s ironic though that it dries clear,and I’m suspecting the urea must have had something to do with that.  Tomorrow night I’ll see where the pine will break and if it’s successful as I think it should be,I’ll be making my own batch of LH from then on.

I wonder though how long the shelf life will be.

 

 


Categories: Hand Tools

Fish Glue Merciless

Thu, 10/19/2017 - 11:10pm

I use hide glue when making up the blanks for the moulding planes, but I don’t like how the colour of hide glue at the join shows that it’s laminated. So I made a trial run with fish glue as I know it will dry to a clear finish and is just as strong as hide glue.

Animal products is not a gap filler, but hide glue to a small degree will fill some small gaps. Fish glue on the other hand shows no mercy. If the join isn’t tight enough, it will not fill it and will remind you how much you suck at woodworking. This means your work has to be God like and how is that possible?

Fish-Glue

As you can see in this scrap of beech, I ripped it into four separate pieces, jointed and edge glued each one individually. You can clearly see that the glue did not fill the gap in the top right corner, but the left side was well done so it’s a seamless join.

I haven’t had the balls to try this when laminating the blanks, because I’m sure there would be gaps on such a large surface.

I think in making up the blanks if you don’t want to see a dark brown colour at the join, then white PVA glue would be a better option.


Categories: Hand Tools

Make Your Own Liquid Hide Glue

Thu, 10/19/2017 - 3:05am

I came across a website several  weeks ago on how to make liquid hide.  I copied it down but didn’t note which website I took it from. So, whomever you are I thank you in advance.

What you need:

  • Hide Granules
  • Urea
  • Water
  • Container

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These three ingredients are mixed by measure of weight. Follow these steps to mix your own batch.

1oz (28grams) of 192 grams strength Hide granules

.2oz (5.6grams) of Urea

1.5oz (42 grams) of distilled water

Mix the Urea into granules and stir it.

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Then pour the distilled water into the mix and give it a quick stir.

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Cover it and let it sit overnight. The next day heat it up to 140°F (60°C) for 2 hours.

(I’m not sure why it’s required to use distilled water unless tap water in the U.S. is filthy)

Liquid Hide is now ready to be used. Pour it into a small plastic bottle and when you need it, just heat the bottle with water up to the same temperature written above.

All well said and done, but we’ll see how works out tomorrow. I’ll keep you posted.

Btw, the Issue III of The Lost Scrolls Of HANDWORK magazine is in its final stage. I’m hoping to publish within the next couple of weeks. Fingers crossed

 


Categories: Hand Tools

Apologies to all

Wed, 10/04/2017 - 9:17pm

I want to apologise to all my readers of HANDWORK for not releasing the third issue in a timely fashion.  It’s very hard to do so because of my current job. It’s a juggling act and the balls are falling all over the place.

Writing this magazine is probably the best thing I have ever ventured into. I know firsthand the benefits in terms of knowledge I have personally gained, and the many benefits others have gained according to the emails of support I have received since releasing the first issue.

It’s not easy by any stretch of the imagination.  Dedicating the time needed to build then write about the build is most difficult.

As we near Christmas things get busy at work and I may have to work 7 days a week for the next couple of months.  It’s crazy I know and the money isn’t so incredible either.  It sure is no way to live.

I’ve started this magazine with good intentions and I had no idea that its popularity would rise so quickly.  May be because it’s free or may be this is what people really want.  But it isn’t possible for me on my own to continue the way I am without ending up in a hospital bed due to exhaustion and being financially strained as well, even though, I’m working inhumane hours to do both and be expected to not walk around looking like a zombie or end up being a corpse.

I have given this much thought and I think I ought to take a leap of faith, go out on a limb and turn it into a business and work it full time. Ha! easier said then done due to lack of finance. Giving up my job till I can earn enough from the magazine if any for that matter to sustain my household is a big risk I’m not willing to take.  Instead, I would like to take baby steps. With that I mean setting a price on the fourth issue.  With the income earned from that I can expand and pay contributing authors for the fifth issue. The money earned from subsequent issues I can begin with some prize giveaways and I’m not talking about some cheap shabby cruddy cheap tool either.  I’m not going to be stingy about any of this.

If you’re all willing to give this a shot, we will have a good hand tool only woodworking magazine.  I cannot do this without your support. The price I’m contemplating to be around US$5.00. Please don’t gruel me out for charging in US dollars as Veritas is a Canadian company and they only charge online in US dollars as their dollar isn’t worth much just like the Aussie dollar.  I think this price is fair and much less than current woodworking magazines on the market.

Let me know your thoughts it would be interesting to hear them.

P.S. All the articles besides the moulding plane build is finished. I have just begun writing the article because I have finished the build only last week.  Yes I know its been slow but blame it on my job and also blame it on the high cost of shipping O1 tool steel.  The shipping costs are twice and in some cases three times the price of the steel.  I’ve also devoured just about every engineering place in my locality hoping to lower the costs a bit and they too made a hefty profit from me.  I wore the cost. So what I’m saying is that I had to stash a little aside every week just to pay the high costs of shipping and there’s the conversion rate and credit card fees on top. Geez have I missed any other fees?


Categories: Hand Tools

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