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A Great Way to Reinforce Mitred Corners

David Barron Furniture - Sun, 02/05/2017 - 4:39am

A little while ago an Article by Neil Erasmus in the very good Australian Wood Review (AWR) magazine, showed an ingenious method of reinforcing mitred corners. I can't find my copy but I'm sure this is the cabinet he used them on, please correct me if I've got any of that wrong!
You can see some of Neil and Pam's great work here http://erasmusdesigns.com/index.php/furniture-all

His method involved joining two Dominoes at right angled which allowed the splines to be inserted in line with each board. I'm sure he used finger joints but I dovetailed mine.


The four sides of my box were cut square and the dominoes cut at the maximum depth the machine would allow.

They were then mitred on the table saw. The twelve Domino joints took just under an hour to do. They were then trimmed to length leaving a small glue gap at the bottom of the mortise.


The splines were glued into the two opposite sides making sure they went in all the way and then the other two sides were glued on.

This meant everything could be glued up at 90 degrees instead of being pulled together with band clamps, so avoiding the struggle of stopping the parts slipping or opening at the corners. It went together like a dream and the corners all lined up perfectly. I'll be doing an article for F&C on this box in the coming months with a few other good tips as well.


Categories: Hand Tools

shop towel holder......

Accidental Woodworker - Sun, 02/05/2017 - 2:12am
This is something that I have wanted to make for quite a while. I first thought of this when I made my sharpening bench but I always put it off. The urge to make it was ramped up again this week and today I decided to make it. Why make excuses as to why I can't do it?  How long can it take take to make something as easy as this? A couple of pieces of wood and a wooden dowel is all that is needed. A one hour job to complete, or so I thought.

my ugly but functional shop towel holder
This holder is above and slightly behind my workbench. It is within arms' reach and still out of the way. This took me about 15 minutes to put together with the premise I would replace it later with a better looking one. It is now about 5 or so years later and I'm still waiting to replace it.

where the new holder is going
The holder will be screwed to the outside of the water bottle tray. I will also be moving that up closer to the top of the bench to make it easier to grab the towels.

the stock for the new holder
This isn't going to be a full blown nutso, take my time build. I just want a functional towel holder and looks are secondary.

the body of the towel holder
The two ends are 4" high and 6/1/2" long. On my existing towel holder I made it to fit the 'blue' shop towels which have a small diameter. Regular paper towels (larger diameter) will fit but it is a tight fit. I shouldn't have that problem with this one. The back board is the same height as the ends and has a length of 13 1/2". The blue shop towels are 11" long and the 2 different brands of paper towels I have are both 11" too. I made the distance inbetween the inside of the end caps 12" - 11" for the roll and 1" for wiggle room.

dovetailed the ends on
I could have used a simple butt joint or a rabbet but I opted for dovetails. These will be stronger and only take a few extra minutes to do. I put the pins on the back board and the tails on the end caps. My reasoning for that was the caps will need to resist the pulling of the towels off of the dowel.

done
Not too bad considering it's been quite a while since I've done tails and pins this thick (3/4"). I had one tail that I moved the baseline on but I wasn't shooting for gnats' ass tight joints. In spite of just sawing away I still got snug joints. I didn't drive this home because I still have more work to do on the end caps.

eyeballing the hole for the dowel
I positioned the hole for the dowel forward of the center toward the front edge. This way if I put a fat roll of paper towels in this it will still spin freely.

drilling the first hole
Set up a stop so that the two holes will line up with each other. The dowel has a 1 1/4" diameter and the hole I'm drilling is 1 3/8".

double triple checking myself
I took my time here and walked away from it twice and came back. I get confused very easily trying to picture which way this opposite one has to go down on the table to be drilled. It was made easier for me because both the holes go right through. This stop system wouldn't work if the holes weren't being drilled straight through.

rounding over the top edge
I marked a 2" radius on the top front edge and I sawed off as much as I could. Then I made myself feel stupid trying to use a spokeshave to clean it up. This is one tool that still kicks my butt when I try to use it on or near end grain. I got nowhere on the first one but I did make some progress on this one. I used the rasp to fair it out down to the pencil line.

glued and end checked for square
repeated on the other end
The pins and tails were snug so I didn't need clamps, I made the ends square to the back and set it aside to cook. I took a break here and went and got chinese for lunch.

almost 3 hours later
 I told myself that I had to wait for the tails and pins to set some before I played with it again. What really happened was I was checking the inside of my eyelids for light leaks for a couple of hours. Good news to report, there weren't any light leaks.

When I did make it back to the shop, I cleaned up the back of the towel holder. The tails were a few frog hairs proud and I wanted this to lay up flat on the water bottle tray.

keeper for the right side
I thought of drilling a stopped hole but I went for straight through. This small block of wood I beveled the top four edges to make it look not so blocky.  It will stop the dowel on the right hand end cap.

brass screws for the stop
This won't be seen on the right side but if I rearrange the shop it might.

chamfered the back side holes
keeper for the right side
I hack sawed off one of legs to be the keeper for this side. I will be able to swing this out of the way and withdraw the dowel so I can put a new roll of towels on.

need a slot
I need a slot on this end of the keeper to slide over the screw. It only took about 3-4 minutes to open this up with the rat tail file.

almost ready
I put two 8-32, threaded inserts in the end cap because this is pine and it is soft. I don't think wood screws would last here. I epoxied the inserts in so I'll have to wait until tomorrow before I can finish this.

what the slot will fall on
The screw head wasn't that much larger than the slot. It would have worked because the keeper isn't going to move outwards.  I epoxied a washer to increase the diameter at the top so it will be beyond the width of the slot. I'll cut this screw to the correct length tomorrow.

it fits
I had a few more things I wanted to do but those didn't happen. The light leak test ate up a lot of my shop time today. If I keep up the OT on saturdays it will probably continue like this and I may have to repeat the light leak test again.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What was on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel before Michelangelo painted it?
answer - a plain blue field with silver stars

Her First Masakari

FABULA LIGNARIUS - Sun, 02/05/2017 - 1:56am
As you may have noticed there has been little going on my blog. I have remained quite busy in the background but don’t find the time to keep up with my carpentry adventures here on the blog. Don’t worry I am sure I will get back to it soon enough, I have been working on […]
Categories: Hand Tools

Letterpress Book a Marriage of High and Low Tech

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 8:38pm

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When I was in college, my favorite place to study was the Deering Library. At the time it was a tricky place to access, filled with odd spaces – beware the moat! – and made me feel like I was at some Gothic institution.

Whenever my head became too full of academics, I’d retreat to the large open chamber in the center of the library. It had an 18th century press there. Full cases of type. No ropes protecting it.

At the time I was working as a production assistant at night dealing with cold type, so I was fascinated by the old press. I spent hours puzzling out how it worked, and no one ever stopped me. After four years, I knew the press pretty well and I took a souvenir when I graduated: My name’s initials in 36 point Caslon.

Letterpress has always fascinated me.

Tomorrow at noon Eastern time the letterpress version of “Roman Workbenches” goes on sale. It is a bit of a throwback to print a letterpress book in this era of offset and digital printing. But the letterpress process produces a physical artifact that no laser writer or offset press can provide.

That’s not to say it’s low technology. Modern letterpress printing is an odd marriage of digital and physical. Here’s a brief overview.

Like all Lost Art Press books, “Roman Workbenches” was laid out in InDesign, an Adobe program that is the industry standard. InDesign works a lot like the manual paste-up days of my years as a production assistant. Minus the smell of hot wax, InDesign has always felt like the digital embodiment of my layout training.

After laying out the book in InDesign, the next step is to make plates for the press. Normally we would send the file to a service bureau to make an aluminum plate for the offset press. But because this is a letterpress book, the process takes a different turn.

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In this case the file will go to Boxcar, a service bureau that makes polymer plates for letterpress. What the heck does that sentence mean?

OK, think of it this way. Traditional letterpress consists of taking a bunch of pieces of metal or wood type and clamping them together to make a page of a book. You ink the high spots and press the paper onto the type.

Polymer plates mimic this process. Boxcar will make 64 separate plates for this book. The type and images will be raised above the background and receive ink. And then the inked areas will be pressed into the paper, producing the final image with incredible clarity and texture.

This is all grossly simplified. So if you are a press nerd we ask that you simply acknowledge that we’re explaining this to people who don’t have ink in their veins.

We used this same process to print the tool chest posters for “The Anarchist’s Tool Chest” and were really pleased with the results. It’s not quite like the fantasy I had of printing a book using the press in the Deering Library. But it is as close as I think I’ll ever come.

See you tomorrow at noon.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Roman Workbenches
Categories: Hand Tools

Making a small barrel.

Mulesaw - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 1:00pm
The other day we received some stores for our main engines. The stores were delivered on a single use pallet.
On this pallet the two lower stretchers were made out of oak. The top of the pallet was some other type of hardwood that I haven't been able to identify yet.

Not surprisingly, I disassembled the pallet to save the wood.
The problem with the oak is that the nails had penetrated rather deeply into the wood.
There was something like 8" between the nail holes, so I tried to think of a small thing that could be made out of short pieces of oak.
There are of course many things that would fit in this category, but I decided that a small barrel similar to those depicted around the neck of a saint Bernard dog would be interesting to make.
Bertha will end up having the same size as a saint Bernard, so I see no reason why she shouldn't be able to have a small barrel of brandy fixed to her collar for taking a photo.

I have never tried my hands out on coopering, so this will be a journey into the unknown in that respect.
The diameter of the barrel will be such that I can make the ends from the oak as well, I am able to make a circular piece of 2.75"" in diameter. The barrel will be 7.25" in length and probably end up having a diameter on the middle of 3.75" That is if everything goes as planned.

I have read somewhere that if you split the wood for the staves, you can reduce the risk of the barrel starting to leak. This makes sense if you use some sort of ring porous wood. I think that oak is ring porous, so I am going to try to follow that advice.

After sawing my piece of oak into the lengths between the nail holes, I split the pieces using an axe.

After splitting I used my plane to flatten the individual staves a bit on the outside.
My first idea was to make them exactly the same thickness from the start, but I changed the approach and only flattened the outside and then I marked out the shape and used a hack saw to make the curved shape.

Once all the staves are done I'll try to plane them all to the same thickness.

So far I have experienced that splitting stock is not a guarantee for a flat piece of wood.
It might have something to do with the fact that the grain isn't the straightest on the wood that I have at hand.
Some of the staves that I had split also had cracks running the entire length down the middle, so far from all my staves could be used.
I am also beginning to suspect that there might be a reason for coopers to use special tools for their job, cause a regular smoothing plane with a scrub iron doesn't seem to be the most efficient tool so far for this project. (Not that such a thing has ever held me back)


Split staves before sorting.

Flattish and shaped staves.

The selection of stock.


Categories: Hand Tools

Coming Soon: Revised & Expanded ‘Handplane Essentials’

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 11:03am

Anyone who knows me personally has probably noticed the the last 12 months have been a struggle. I have been months behind on everything: delivering furniture commissions, restoring my workshop, writing magazine articles and even posting to this blog. The reason: the revised and expanded edition of “Handplane Essentials.” When I agreed to revise the 2009 book I expected it would take a couple weeks of intense work. I was […]

The post Coming Soon: Revised & Expanded ‘Handplane Essentials’ appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Tips from Sticks in the Mud – February 2017 – Tip #1 – Benefits of a Mobile Grinding Station

Highland Woodworking - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 7:00am

Welcome to “Tips From Sticks-In-The-Mud Woodshop.” I am a hobbyist who loves woodworking and writing for those who also love the craft. I have found some ways to accomplish tasks in the workshop that might be helpful to you, and I enjoy hearing your own problem-solving ideasPlease share them in the COMMENTS section of each tip.  If, in the process, I can also make you laugh, I have achieved 100% of my goals.

Mobile bases are terrific. I like being able to move a tool to the location of the work, or, sometimes, just move it in order to clean.

Last month I posted about the new sharpening center. This month, I finalized something I’ve been wanting to do for a long time. In the sharpening center post, I mentioned that I’d considered putting a low-speed grinder on the deck, but worried that it might be crowded, as well as the risk of mixing water and electricity. Still, I wanted to have the grinder close by when it was needed, and this is how I fixed it…

When our Sears store had a local repair center, their dumpster was sometimes a gold mine. They would throw out things that seemed to be perfectly useful. One day I’d been there to drop off my dehumidifier for annual maintenance, when a grey object caught my eye. I wheeled around to check and, sure enough, a Craftsman tool stand was just outside the dumpster. As the proud owner of a Craftsman radial arm saw, I thought I’d pick it up in case I wanted to mount the saw on it. I’d already built the saw into my “saw table,” but it was a prize too good to pass up.

Over time, the stand was in my way, and I was happy with the saw table setup, so I started looking for other uses. It seemed ideally suited for a grinder, so I took a scrap of plywood and bolted it securely. To the plywood I attached my little Craftsman grinder. It was a good working height as- is.

For many years after I started woodworking, I was a terrible sharpener. In an effort to improve, I looked at a Work Sharp 3000 Sharpening Center, Scary Sharp sandpaper and several Tormek sharpening options. While I’m convinced that Tormek is worth every penny, I just couldn’t quite convince myself to drop the necessary coin. Since Steven Johnson’s excellent video on the Tormek T-4 Sharpening System, I’m now a believer, but I was already committed to a slow-speed grinder.

When my Steel City slow-speed grinder arrived, I was at first elated, then deflated. During shipping, the grinder must have fallen on its left side, because there were several parts bent. I called the company, and they were glad to take care of the problem. In fact, they sent me an entirely new grinder, and didn’t even want the old one back! I couldn’t be happier with the replacement. It was easy to unbolt the Craftsman, move it 90i, and have grinders back-to-back.

As Christmas approached, my wife asked me repeatedly what I wanted. Since I didn’t need anything, it was hard for me to produce ideas, but I settled on a DMT diamond plate and a universal mobile base. In no time I had a moveable grinder setup that could follow my wet sharpening system around the shop whenever and wherever they were needed.

Mounted on a mobile base, this grinder setup is ready to go wherever the work is, or just get out of the way of an oncoming vacuum cleaner.

Mounted on a mobile base, this grinder setup is ready to go wherever the work is, or just get out of the way of an oncoming vacuum cleaner.

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Tips from Sticks in the Mud – February 2017 – Tip #1 – Benefits of a Mobile Grinding Station appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Boycott?

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 6:21am

***NOTE*** I slightly altered the title of this post to reflect what a commenter pointed out to me…

I try to never interject politics with woodworking. Why in the world would you need to attach a political ideology to the hobby of woodworking? Nonetheless, this post is about politics, so I urge you to please not read it if you would rather be reading about dovetails and tool restoration (I mean this sincerely, not as a half-assed attempt at reverse psychology)

Anyway, if you are following American politics lately, you are likely noticing a lot of division, protests, and in some cases, out right anarchy. As far as protests are concerned, I will only say that they almost never work. They are generally poorly organized and incoherent acts of aggression that ultimately degrade into physical violence and destruction. And almost always protests do little more than further anger their target audience, which is maybe what they set out to do in the first place. If you want to tell me that protests change the world I will disagree and tell you that you are wrong. And if you believe in psychology, which I do, I will tell you to research the psychology of protests/protesters (which is easy to do especially with the internet) and you will read that at their core all public protests violent outbursts that nearly always further alienate the protesters with those who do not agree with them. Even more so, public protests often tend to push people away who may have been “on the fence” when it came to the cause being protested. And the psychological make-up of protesters is even more disturbing, but I’ll leave that to anybody reading this post to research on their own if they care to do so.

Boycotts, however, are something I can get behind. Boycotts are personal, they can make a difference (hurting a company’s bottom line always seems to open up some eyes), and they can be facilitated without breaking windows and physically assaulting old people. There are some companies I have boycotted for a long time, and others more recently. For instance, after some of the events which unfolded last summer, I no longer watch or attend professional sports, and that was something I had done for my entire life.

Boycotts seem to be all the rage right now, but just like freedom of speech, a boycott swings both ways. Less than a week ago I was about to take some of my hard-earned money and purchase a woodworking product when I happened to read something disturbing on the company web page. I am not going to name that company (yet) but I will only say that it was a thinly veiled attack of not only our current President, but far more importantly, our political system. I have had my issues with every single person who has held the office of President (including the current one) since I’ve been old enough to understand how the American political system operates. But I’ve always respected the office and our government. Even more to the point, whoever wrote what they did seems to have very little understanding of how a Republic functions, which really makes me question their intelligence. And I certainly don’t want to give my hard-earned money to stupid people whenever I can help it.

Sadly, another company that I’ve dealt with since I’ve made woodworking my hobby has also used their influence as a forum to push their own political agenda. Once again, what they are doing is perfectly within their rights, but I don’t want to see or hear a political diatribe, subtle or no, when I’m trying to purchase a woodworking item. So from now on both of those companies will no longer see a penny of my business. Attacking a politician is one thing-though it should not be done on a retail company’s webpage IMO-but attacking the American political system and questioning its validity is something I will not tolerate, because I believe our system is still the best option when considering the thousands of years worth of failures of countless other political systems.

You may have noticed that I have not named those companies, and that is because I believe that boycotts are a personal thing, and I am not trying to influence anybody one way or the other. BUT….I wrote this post for a reason. If I do happen to see another woodworking company attempt to use their business to influence the political decisions of their customers, or undermine the American political system in general, I will do anything in my power to encourage others to not purchase their products, and at that I will be naming names. That “power” may not add up to much, but if a bunch of morons blocking traffic and setting fires can supposedly change the world, I’m more than confident that I can as well.


Categories: General Woodworking

What Joints Should I Use in Furniture? - Ask M&T

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 3:53am

 

We’ve just posted our first “Ask M&T” video on our YouTube channel. We had a reader ask us, “As a novice woodworker, I struggle to determine the best joints for my projects. What’s the best method of determining the most appropriate joint for any given project?” 

The above is our “Ask M&T” answer to that very question. 

We’re excited about this new series because it enables us to give time to give full answers to our readers’ questions. Since our number one goal with M&T is to celebrate historic craftsmanship by empowering readers to work efficiently with plane and saw, we thought it would be a good idea to film our answers for you.

So consider this a start. Not sure how often we’ll do this. Hopefully on a regular schedule. Got a question? Wonder what our opinion is on a topic? Ask away. We’ll do our best to give whatever answer we can.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

What Joints Should I Use in Furniture? - Ask M&T

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 3:53am

 

We’ve just posted our first “Ask M&T” video on our YouTube channel. We had a reader ask us, “As a novice woodworker, I struggle to determine the best joints for my projects. What’s the best method of determining the most appropriate joint for any given project?” 

The above is our “Ask M&T” answer to that very question. 

We’re excited about this new series because it enables us to give time to give full answers to our readers’ questions. Since our number one goal with M&T is to celebrate historic craftsmanship by empowering readers to work efficiently with plane and saw, we thought it would be a good idea to film our answers for you.

So consider this a start. Not sure how often we’ll do this. Hopefully on a regular schedule. Got a question? Wonder what our opinion is on a topic? Ask away. We’ll do our best to give whatever answer we can.

 

Categories: Hand Tools

My Encounter With Future Woodworking

Paul Sellers - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 1:26am

I’ve learned many things through my encounters with woodworkers through the decades. Amateurs have many characteristics the more notable is their willingness to talk about their aspirations to improve their skill levels and their knowledge and then their willingness to share their gain with others whether likeminded or perhaps just interested but more remotely. So I listen …

Read the full post My Encounter With Future Woodworking on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

workbench update......

Accidental Woodworker - Sat, 02/04/2017 - 12:53am

My new workbench isn't going to be a Roubo nor a traditional english joiners bench (Paul Sellers design) or the 12 footer that Richard Maguire did on his workbench build video. Instead I plan on making the same bench I have now and making it look pretty. The bench I have now has endured me beating the snot out of it for over twenty years and it has served me well. Now that I am approaching retirement age and I have the resources, I want a new workbench.

The cost of this bench so far has been shock to my system. It is way, way, too much money for the faint hearted. I bought a Record 53E a few weeks ago that is still waiting for me to clean it up. I have taken it down to parade rest but that is all I've done with it. I bought a pound of citric acid to clean the rust on it and I misplaced it. It sucks to get old and forget what you ate for breakfast at lunchtime.

I pulled the trigger on the Benchcrafted tail vise the other day and I'm still waiting for that to come in. I also added the Benchcrafted rail and tail vise end cap bolts and nuts to the order. I was going to wait on them but I ordered them at the same time. I was going to get the clubber stuff but it is/was out of stock. An email today from Benchcrafted advised ordering the clubber separately so I may do that.

I now have all the vises and hardware needed for the bench. I plan on making my own dogs out of wood so I don't need to buy them. I could reuse the metal ones from my existing bench but I plan on giving that away. I'm pretty sure someone else will get another twenty plus years out of it and be able to pass it on from themselves too.

As it stands now, without having bought one stick of wood, I am out of pocket almost $700 for the two vises. I've been searching the internet for wood and there is no good news. Initially I was hoping to get a slab of maple and put a dog block on the front edge of it. But the prices on slabs are orbiting around Jupiter. I found one -3 1/2" thick, 18" wide before the live edge, and a little over 8 feet long. It was figured hard maple, and it was mine was the low price of $2,200.00. It seems these slabs are in high demand for coffee tables, etc, and because they are  artsy fartsy, I have to pay a premium for them.

Changed lanes on the slab and I'm going with Highlands Hardwoods for everything. The base will be red oak and the top all maple. I'm estimating about $350 for the base and $400 to $500 for the top. With Trump freezing federal hiring, I think my OT is going to last for a while and the positions aren't going to be filled for quite a while.

The workbench plan which is now about as firm as unset jello, has me buying the base and making that first and then buying the top and making that. I'm looking at august or september before I'll be working on the new bench.

handle came
I took a chance on buying this handle. I did it based on a picture of it and a measurement I took on the broken one. I got lucky because it matched up perfectly with the broken one.

I have gotten a few comments on repairing the old handle with heat. Mathias Wandel did a you tube on fixing broken plastic with heat. I had nothing to lose trying the heat thing on my broken handle but I'm not going to do it now. My son-in-law told me that the epoxy and the plastic together when heated may give off toxic fumes. I don't want to chance sniffing anything that might even be remotely harmful so I tossed the broken one in the shitcan.

installed
Putting this on made me feel stupid for a few minutes. At the bottom there is a 'U' shaped channel that slips over a screw on the refrigerator at the bottom of the handle. I didn't look at it closely and I tried to put it on the screw by dropping it straight down onto it. After several tries of that not happening, I looked at it closely. It slips over the screw by coming up straight from the bottom. Two screws at the top and my wife has a happy face on now.

#3 low know in rosewood
I got this from Drozs Olde Tyme Stanley knobs and totes. This knob is drop dead gorgeous. I had heard good things about Drozs stuff but this was something I wasn't expecting. This knob is a work of art and will look fantastic on my #3.

the other side of the knob

big difference in the sizes
I like the smaller dimensions of the Drozs knob. I think it fits the size of the #3 much better than the mushroom knob that is on it now. This one will go on the current #3 and I ordered another one of these knobs for the other #3.

low knobs on both the #3's
Even between the two #3 mushroom knobs there is a difference. Both are larger than the Drozs knob and I think both of these are off #4's.

it doesn't fit
The stud is too long. I can't tighten down the barrel nut and secure the knob. I could cut down the stud or buy a couple more from Bill Rittner and wait. I do have patience for some things and I'll order and wait.

it's about a 1/4" too high
stripped out the slot of this barrel nut
I have a lot of spares so I can replace this.

tried two different barrel nuts
I tried one of the Bill Rittner nuts and a older one and neither worked. The older screwed down a wee bit more but still not enough to secure the knob.

the knob on my 10 1/2
The Drozs knob fits on the 10 1/2 stud and can be secured without spinning etc etc. The 10 1/2 knob is squatter and fatter, but both are the same height.

I rounded the lid entry ends
I like this rounded look more than the mitered one. But either one is a better choice than leaving it squared off.

head on
the opposite side
I think I'll be adding this detail to box #2 and all future boxes I make in this style.

remembered I had these
I bought these two from Highlands Hardware 6-7 years ago? At the time I bought these, I had no idea about eBay or any other source for plane parts. I think I used the barrel nuts and nothing else.

plastic knob and tote
To me these look ugly, feel ugly, and they will probably still be in this box a 100 years from now.

two bags of plane hardware parts
no joy in Mudville
The stud on the right is the from the #3. The stud on the left is the smallest one in either bag. It looks like all the studs are for high knobs only. I do have a complete set of screws etc for one plane plus a few extras. I'll have to wait until Bill sends me a PayPal for new studs and then I should have them by the middle of next week.

I didn't get to sharpen and hone my torus bead plane iron so I'll be doing that tomorrow. I did check the boxing I glued yesterday and that set up fine. I want to try the plane out again after I sharpen the iron to see how it performs then.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
What is misphonia?
answer - Selective  Sound Sensitivity Syndrome where certain sounds can trigger a panic attack or enrage you

Llits d’Olot (Beds of Olot)

The Furniture Record - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 10:11pm

Olot is the capital city of the comarca of Garrotxa, in the Province of Girona, Catalonia, Spain on the European continent of the third planet of a star located at Sector 001. Approximately.

This blog is about the beds of Olot or more accurately, the headboards of the beds of Olot created in the late 18th century. Reading badly translated articles, by 1787, there were six workshops specializing in making headboards, making 300 to 500 per year. There was no master bedmaker but rather a collaboration between carpenters, carvers and painter/gilders.  The articles also claim that some of these headboards were even shipped to the Americas in spite of their bulk and delicate nature.

From the wall in the exhibit:

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I couldn’t have said it better myself. And it saved me a bunch of copying and typing.

The beds/headboards speak for themselves so I offer them without comment.

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This headboard seems to be a variation of the one below.

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Or this one is a variation of the one above.

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Konrad and Riley Take the Torch

The Barn on White Run - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 8:14pm

 

Konrad Sauer blogged today about my passing a torch to himself and his son, the “torch” being the restoration of a classic 1968 Volvo P1800 (the “Saint” car) I bought more than thirty years ago with the intention of restoring it into my every day car.  Well, life intruded and it sat in my shed for all those years until I gave it to them last summer.

It should be an ultra-cool project, and Konrad promised me a visit to The Barn on White Run with his wife once the project is done.

Can’t wait to follow the tale and to welcome them to the mountains..

Nicholson Bench, Almost Finished

Brese Plane - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 8:08pm

Lots of progress on the Nicholson bench this week. In the picture below you can see that a stretcher across the center of the bench has been added and end caps have been fitted and installed as well. When the top boards are added this essentially makes this a solid maple torsion box of sorts.



The center stretcher has been lagged in place, however the end caps have a tenon that slips into a mortise at the ends of the bench.  I did not want to depend on a couple lags screws to hold everything in place when the leg vise applies outward pressure on the end cap. In this configuration the pressure is applied to the tenon that in turn presses against the side of the mortise. Note that I made the mortise slightly deeper than the length of the tenon. When the lag screw pulls the aprons against the shoulder of the end cap it establishes the width of the bench assembly. I wanted it to fit tight against the shoulder of the end cap and not bottom out in the mortise.



The lags I obtained to use for this bench are squared headed lags with a black oxide finish. I think it plays well with the finish on the vise hardware. I sunk the heads into counterbores on the front of the bench but left them on the surface on the rear apron.



The video below shows some of the other work that's taken place since the last post. Smoothing, making bench dogs and fitting the leg vise.




When making my first bench Jameel Abraham advised me to make dogs for every dog hole. This may seem a bit extravagant but not having to move bench dogs around to different holes saves an enormous amount of time over the course of several years of bench work. If you watch the video and wonder why my bench dogs are so long there is a reason. The Nicholson bench has a wide apron. Unless you have arms like an Orangoutang the dogs need to be at least as long as the apron is wide, otherwise they will be quite difficult to pop up for use.

I also opted to make my dogs from 1" diameter rock maple dowel stock. This extra diameter makes it possible to cut taller faces on the dogs and I've been amazed on how rigid they feel compared to 3/4" diameter bench dogs.

The next post should be the conclusion of the bench build,

Ron

I do the very best I know how - the very best I can; and I mean to keep on doing so until the end. Abraham Lincoln




Categories: Hand Tools

Guitar Capos/Cejillas for Classical and Flamenco Guitars

Brokeoff Mountain Luthierie - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 4:02pm
Any prejudice that may exist against the use of this device (capotasto) with the classical guitar should be dispelled by the knowledge that Giuliani's nickname given to him by a frivolous secret society to which he belonged was Vilax Umo Capodastro.

Frederick Noad, The Classical Guitar, 1976


I made eight capos/cejillas for classical or flamenco guitars.

These cejillas/capos are based on a traditional Spanish design that dates from the 18th century. The peg is made from rosewood, the center section of each capo (capodastre) is carved from either hard maple or East Indian rosewood and the sides of the capo are either curly maple or East Indian rosewood.

Current capo inventory consists of two with curly maple sides and four with East Indian rosewood sides. There are two capos made from solid Vermillion, a very gorgeous hard wood from Africa.

All pegs are attached to the capo with LaBella brand flamenco "G" string, the faces that go against the guitar strings are covered with neoprene and the peg string is covered with vinyl tubing to protect the guitar neck.

The laminated capos are $30 a piece, plus shipping.

The vermillion capos are $20 a piece, plus shipping.

I will not be making anymore capos until June or July of 2017.

Please contact me at highcountrylutherie@gmail.com if you would like to buy a capo!

Thanks!




Categories: Luthiery

Update on new class

Heritage School of Woodworking Blog - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 3:50pm

I just wanted to let everyone know we had quite a number of people interested in the roubo workbench class. So I am trying to have the class planned and scheduled before the end of this month. Jonathan

The post Update on new class appeared first on Heritage School of Woodworking Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

New Shirts in Stock! “Craftsmanship is Risk”

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 11:38am

 

We just launched our new “Craftsmanship is Risk” t-shirts in the store. We are offering this design in 3 new colors. Check all the colors out here. As a thank you for your support, we are offering free shipping on these shirts for the first week. Also note that we have now discounted our previous “Artisan” shirt to $18. We don’t have every size in stock but if you want one of these, just know we will not be doing another run. All our designs are a one-time deal. They will only be in our store as long as we have them in stock.

FREE SHIPPING ON THE NEW SHIRT UNTIL 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11th! 

It’s not news that the term “workmanship of risk” has made David Pye famous in woodworking circles. The term was coined by Pye in the mid 20th century to describe workmanship that depends on the skill of the maker rather than complex jigs which ensure “perfection”. This is seen mostly clearly in tools like hatchets, chisels, and even to some degree hand planes.

This concept has been passed around woodworking circles for years but what is less known is that Pye developed the term as a definition for the word “craftsmanship”. On page 20 of his Nature and Art of Workmanship, he writes,

“If I must ascribe meaning to the word craftsmanship, I shall say as a first approximation that it means simply workmanship using any kind of technique or apparatus, in which the quality of the result is not predetermined, but depends on the judgment, dexterity, and care which the maker exercises as he works. The essential idea is that the quality of the result is continually at risk during the process of making; and so I shall call this kind of workmanship ‘The Workmanship of Risk’: an uncouth phrase, but at least descriptive.”

We think seeing the essence of craft bound up with the “riskiness” of working with unregulated tools is a dead on. There is a lot of skillful workmanship in the world but the one that we at M&T particularly want to celebrate is the one called “craftsmanship”.

This shirt is for those who want to celebrate handcraft and so we wear it with pride to know we are part of a rich tradition of woodworking passed down from our ancestors. We hope you wear this shirt along with us on this journey to relearn how to work with our hands by the sweat of our brow.

Front Design: Roman woodworker and M&T logo

Back Design: "CRAFTSMANSHIP IS RISK."

100% Combed fine jersey cotton. Incredibly comfortable and soft vintage feel.

Printed in Alabama by fellow woodworking enthusiast Shannon Brantley (http://flannelandfloral.com and @nubthumb). We are really impressed with the quality and feel of these shirts and think you will be too.

ORDER YOURS HERE.

 

P.s. We've got an exciting announcement next week for you international folks...

 

Categories: Hand Tools

New Shirts in Stock! “Craftsmanship is Risk”

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 11:38am

 

We just launched our new “Craftsmanship is Risk” t-shirts in the store. We are offering this design in 3 new colors. Check all the colors out here. As a thank you for your support, we are offering free shipping on these shirts for the first week. Also note that we have now discounted our previous “Artisan” shirt to $18. We don’t have every size in stock but if you want one of these, just know we will not be doing another run. All our designs are a one-time deal. They will only be in our store as long as we have them in stock.

FREE SHIPPING ON THE NEW SHIRT UNTIL 
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11th! 

It’s not news that the term “workmanship of risk” has made David Pye famous in woodworking circles. The term was coined by Pye in the mid 20th century to describe workmanship that depends on the skill of the maker rather than complex jigs which ensure “perfection”. This is seen mostly clearly in tools like hatchets, chisels, and even to some degree hand planes.

This concept has been passed around woodworking circles for years but what is less known is that Pye developed the term as a definition for the word “craftsmanship”. On page 20 of his Nature and Art of Workmanship, he writes,

“If I must ascribe meaning to the word craftsmanship, I shall say as a first approximation that it means simply workmanship using any kind of technique or apparatus, in which the quality of the result is not predetermined, but depends on the judgment, dexterity, and care which the maker exercises as he works. The essential idea is that the quality of the result is continually at risk during the process of making; and so I shall call this kind of workmanship ‘The Workmanship of Risk’: an uncouth phrase, but at least descriptive.”

We think seeing the essence of craft bound up with the “riskiness” of working with unregulated tools is a dead on. There is a lot of skillful workmanship in the world but the one that we at M&T particularly want to celebrate is the one called “craftsmanship”.

This shirt is for those who want to celebrate handcraft and so we wear it with pride to know we are part of a rich tradition of woodworking passed down from our ancestors. We hope you wear this shirt along with us on this journey to relearn how to work with our hands by the sweat of our brow.

Front Design: Roman woodworker and M&T logo

Back Design: "CRAFTSMANSHIP IS RISK."

100% Combed fine jersey cotton. Incredibly comfortable and soft vintage feel.

Printed in Alabama by fellow woodworking enthusiast Shannon Brantley (http://flannelandfloral.com and @nubthumb). We are really impressed with the quality and feel of these shirts and think you will be too.

ORDER YOURS HERE.

 

P.s. We've got an exciting announcement next week for you international folks...

 

Categories: Hand Tools

All day sharpening seminar

Alaska Creative Woodworkers Association - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 10:55am
Sunday, February 12th.  9:00am – 4:00pm at Anchorage Well and Pump Bring any sharpening gear you have but don’t worry if you don’t, we have some to learn on. Class will be $25 and includes lunch. We will try to cover several types of sharpening from water and oil stones to power sharpening and grinding. Bring a stool to sit on if you would like and plan on leaving with a few very sharp plane irons and chisels. You must […]

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