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The Woodworking Blogs Aggregator

This "aggregator" collects all of the woodworking blogs I read every day - or try to anyway!  Enjoy!

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Old. Growth.

McGlynn On Making - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 7:22pm

In processing the lumber for my marquetry press, two of the shorter components ended up unusable.  Too many nails.

The simple solution would be to pick up some green construction lumber at the local yard.  So I did.  Cheap, fast, easy.

Check out the difference in growth rings.  The reclaimed wood, from a 100 year old barn has fine, tight growth rings.  While the piece I picked up today is very coarse and has less than 1/4 of the growth rings per inch.

Old growth, fine-grained wood on top.  New, green, fast growth on the bottom.

Old growth, fine-grained wood on top. New, green, fast growth on the bottom.

I can probably use the new wood, but I don’t like the look of it.  I’m going to try gluing up some of the scraps instead.


Categories: General Woodworking

But I can’t get woodworking this week!!!

The Light Hearted Woodworker - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 6:32pm

So today is the last day of Get Woodworking Week 2015 and I am 2500 miles from my shop.  So I haven’t got any woodworking done.

However–one of the perks of my job is traveling and staying in fancy hotels and at the moment I am suffering through 70 Degree weather out in Hollywood (it is 10 Degrees back in NY).  So I am not complaining.  But I will be here for three weeks which means about a month with no shop time.  Bummer, but I keep my mind on the wood–I still read the blogs and as a woodworker I am always on the lookout for interesting furniture and art built from wood. I constantly snap pics with my phone of things that peak my interest, either that I admire and think “I could build that” or pieces that I look at and think “What the ….?”

So instead of sharing what I’ve been up to in the shop I thought I would share some photos of pieces I’ve found travels.

I’ll start with some of the woodwork in my hotel in Beverly Hills.

This is a beautiful wall of wood 'plates' in the bar of the hotel

This is a beautiful wall of wood ‘plates’ in the bar of the hotel

A detail of one of the plates

A detail of one of the plates

Panel doors that close off the door.  CNC'd  but a very slick design.

Panel doors that close off the door. CNC’d but a very slick design.

A detail of the same bar panels

A detail of the same bar panels.

I call these the Into the Woods panels.  Used in the restaurant  as dividing walls.  As a lighting designer I am big fan of these.  This is  also where I get coffee every morning!!

I call these the “Into the Woods” panels. Used in the restaurant as dividing walls. As a lighting designer I am big fan of these. This is also where I get coffee every morning!!

Some wacky stick pile art in the corner.  Kinda cool though.

Some wacky stick pile art in the corner. Kinda cool though.

It’s fun to travel to different parts of the country and see what they see as art and decor. The next photos are from Miami, a place where I don’t think any woodworker lives!  Plaid wool shirts are a little hot I suppose.

This is the root of a tree cut into a table and gold leafed.  yup.....

This is the root of a tree cut into a table and gold leafed. yup…..

...and here is a gold leafed stump.

…and here is a gold leafed stump.

These slabs were standing in the lobby as art work.  I am a huge fan of live edge slabs, but felt like I was walking through the lumber yard.  Felt really out of place in South Beach.

These slabs were standing in the lobby as art work. I am a huge fan of live edge slabs, but felt like I was walking through the lumber yard. Felt really out of place in South Beach.

But who am I to judge.  Besides, some woodworker can make a lot of money selling these.... I am looking at you  Dale Osowski!!

But who am I to judge. Besides, some woodworker can make a lot of money selling these…. I am looking at you Dale Osowski!!

A different hotel in Miami had woodgrain elevators.  Again, very odd on the beach.

A different hotel in Miami had woodgrain elevators. Again, very odd on the beach.

Here is a bench made from a beam in the hallway of a hotel.  the rest of the decor was cement walls and very industrial, so this fit, but certainly goes into the category of "I can do that".

Here is a bench made from a beam in the hallway of a hotel. the rest of the decor was cement walls and very industrial, so this fit, but certainly goes into the category of “I can do that”.

This Thimble Table served as my coaster for many nights.  ;)

This Thimble Table served as my coaster for many nights. ;)

 This is a Hollywood Dust Collector!!  This is from the scene shop on the Paramount lot.  Everything is big in Hollywood!

And finally:
This is a Hollywood Dust Collector!! This is from the scene shop on the Paramount lot. Everything is big in Hollywood!

So while I can’t be in the shop this week, woodworking is always on my mind.  I see it everywhere I go.  That’s what makes it such a passionate hobby.

That said:  Tomorrow I am sneaking out of work and headed to the Sam Maloof house outside of LA for a tour!!  So excited!  I’ll report back….


Categories: Hand Tools

Ultra Cheep Lapping Plates

The Barn on White Run - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 6:07pm

Cosmologists assert that the four phenomena holding the Universe together are 1) strong inter atomic forces, 2) weak inter atomic forces, 3) gravity, and 4) magnetism.  Which shows how little they know, as somehow they overlooked 5) duct tape, and 6) shellac.

What has this got to do with The Barn?

Well, nothing actually, but it does lead me to another fundamental phenomenon of the Universe, namely inertia: a body at rest tends to stay at rest, and a body in motion tends to stay in motion.  For the purposes of this post Chris Schwarz and Joe McGlynn fall into the latter camp, I in the former.  These two guys seem to be the very definition of peripatetic.  I am, shall we say, more contemplative.  Yeah, that’s the word, contemplative.  (“Lazy” was so much less mellifluous).

One of the things I really like about my studio in the barn is a dedicated sharpening station, and thanks to the inspiration of plane makers Konrad Sauer, Raney Nelson, and Ron Brese, and inventive scrounging genius Mike Siemsen I have long recognized the utility and hence have desired an elegant lapping plate for that work station.  Recently I was at the building recycling center and saw a stack of granite splash boards, probably from a kitchen where the users finally came to their senses and had the granite ripped out in favor of some nice butcher block wood slab counters.

cIMG_8357

Anyway, I selected two pieces that fit my needs, and they were a whole fifty-cents apiece.  They are 4-inches wide and 24-inches long, which makes them a perfect fit for 4×24 sanding belts for a portable belt sander.  yes, I do own one; I have found no better way to sharpen lawnmower blades.

cIMG_8358

Using the polished granite surface as my base, and spray adhesive as the binder, I first tore the sanding belt once crosswise, then applied it to the granite.  Voilay!  An instant lapping plate.  Given my two pieces of back splash, I can mount four different grits of sanding belt simultaneously, so regardless of the delicacy of the task I am ready to roll. Or lap, as the case may be.

Coffee Table Finished

I'm a OK guy - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 4:29pm
The coffee table is finished. Well almost, I still have to attach the top which I will do tomorrow. I've had enough fun for today, my back is yelling No Mas No Mas followed by Cerveza Por Favor.  I think I'm going to listen.


Simple Type of Indian Home Cot

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 4:03pm

Indian_cot

ONE of our Indian readers sends us particulars for the making of a simple home cot, which we think will be of general interest.

The cot consists of a skeleton framework supported by four legs, the overall height being 18 ins. The length of the cot is 5 ft. 6 ins., the width 3 ft. 6 ins. The mattress is made by weaving a good strong tape mesh as suggested in the top right corner of the plan drawing. The method of jointing the side and end rails of the cot to the legs is somewhat unusual and, if the maker is not familiar with the joint, he is advised to make a rough model of one corner before proceeding with his work. Fig. 1 shows a plan of the cot as seen from above. Fig. 2 is the front elevation, showing on the right a turned leg as suggested by our Indian contributor, whilst on the left we show a square tapered leg having a foot which is suitable for those makers who have no lathe. The wood used for construction of the article is generally teakwood, but there is no reason why such wood as ash, beech or birch should not be used. Fig. 3 gives an end elevation.

The following is a list of the wood required: Four legs, 1 ft. 7 ins. by 3 ins. by 3 ins.; two long bars, 5 ft. 7 ins by 3 ins. by 1-1/2 ins. and two end bars 3 ft. 7 ins. by 3-1/2 ins. by 1-1/2 ins. An arch has been allowed in the length of the bars, but they should finish in width and thickness to the sizes given.

At Fig. 4 we show a sketch of the cross and end bar mortised into the leg, and it will be seen that a turned hardwood peg fits into a suitably provided hole and locks the tenons, which are dry jointed (not glued) in position.

The head of this turned peg forms an ornament or finish at the top of the leg and it should of course fit tightly in position so as to prevent the youngster from pulling it out. Fig. 5 gives a sketch of the end and cross bars in their relative positions when they are apart from the leg. At Fig. 6 is given a sketch of the end bar and cross bar when the cot is fixed in position, but in this illustration the leg is purposely left out of the drawing for a clear representation. Fig. 7 shows the joints of the leg portion when the part of the leg above the line (A, Fig. 4) is sawn off. The hardwood peg is shown at Fig. 8. The above methods of illustrating the joint have been chosen because the interlacing of so many dotted lines in the ordinary sketch makes it next to impossible for a worker who is not familiar with the joint to follow an ordinary drawing.

If beech, birch or ash is used it may be stained either mahogany or walnut colour, after which it may be given a coat of brush polish and when this is hard the work may be wax polished. If the cot is made in teak wood it may be finished as above, but without staining.

We are indebted to Mr. S. V. Ramesad, of Beswada, India, for the above particulars. (600)

— from The Woodworker magazine, May 1925


Filed under: Campaign Furniture, Furniture of Necessity
Categories: Hand Tools

Citric Acid available at the Grocery Store

MVFlaim Furnituremaker - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 3:22pm

Who knew? I can buy my citric acid for derusting my tools straight from the grocery store. At $8.49/lb, I’ll have to see if it’s a better deal than eBay.

image


More Carving Commissions!

Mary May, Woodcarver - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 3:16pm

Mary May - Woodcarver

I’m very happy to say that these past few weeks have been very busy with commissions. Since my step-son, Caleb has been editing my videos for my online school, I have been enjoying a lot more time in the workshop. Here are some of the carvings I have been working on.

4 corners of a mirror frame in basswood

4 corners of a mirror frame in basswood

These are 4 carved corners for a reproduction of an 1830’s mirror. These were carved in basswood and are a very 3-dimensional fleur de lis. I filmed the process of carving one of these, and Caleb is currently in the process of editing this full lesson. It should be available on my online school next month. It’s over 2 hours, so it might end up being 3 episodes. It is carved in 2-1/4″ thick wood, so there is a LOT of shape to these.

One of 2 sunburst designs for a door surround

One of 2 sunburst designs for a door surround

This carving is one of 2 sunburst designs I made for the tops of pilasters on a door surround. This was made for a local woodworking company that installs custom interior woodwork – Southern Lumber. It is carved in sapele (sometimes referred to as mahogany or African mahogany). Sapele can often be very difficult to carve because the grain tends to switch on you about every 1/4″ to 1/2″. It definitely keeps it a challenge, but this particular wood did not cause too many frustrations.

I ended up filming this while I carved it – just because. But I already have a lesson that is very similar to this on my online school.

Flame finials

Flame finials

And then there is that wonderful flame finial. My customer started one finial and asked me to finish it and wanted me to carve 2 additional finials. Just the layout is a real challenge – and then to try and figure out how the flame shapes flow is a real brain tease. This is lightly based on a design for an 18th century period secretary or highboy from the Philadelphia area. I say “lightly” because any descriptions that I read in books about how to lay out these finials fried too many brain cells for me to get through the article.

However, since I had one that my customer started, I just had to base the others on his design. Simple, right? Well, it took me about 2 hours staring at his finial and turning it in all directions to figure out what the pattern was. I finally got it! The main thing to focus on with these finials is to keep “S” curves no matter what – whether they are the high corner peaks, or the deep, sharp inside corners. All lines should be continually flowing in “S” curves with no straight lines. With that in mind, there are many ways to lay these out – and many different designs and styles out there. I just designed a new one!

This process was also filmed, so probably within 2 months, this will be on my online school.

I have a great heater in my shop, so when it only gets up to 35 degrees outside, I’m toasty warm while I work. Yeah, I know, that’s NOTHING compared to what other parts of the country are experiencing right now. But this is South Carolina! And I admit it – I have become a wimp. My Minnesota blood has thinned out somewhat over the past 15 years.

20150219_192008_HDR

Our toasty warm fireplace.

A nice fire in our fireplace. Hmmm. Something is missing. Maybe a carving on the mantel? The fireplace has been like that for nearly 14 years – taunting me every time I look at it. This is truly the “cobbler’s shoes” dilemma. Maybe one day…

More Meaning Beyond Machining and Hand Work

Paul Sellers - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 2:29pm

Some of you expressed surprise in my using machines for long and extended days for manufacturing. That was a past life for me. One day I rebelled and said never again. I will never go back there.

In the same way some lament lost family, lost countrymen and lost comrades, I lament the sense of wellbeing many may never know without my working to share what I have been so blessed with. I know I am not the only one and that there are many ways to reach a goal and not just mine.

Perhaps this song will help amplify my concerns as you read.

The thoughts I express in my blog are not from the standpoint of someone working wood part time and standing at a machine for an your or two a week or a month but those of a man feeling a sense of lostness and searching for a door of escape when day after day and week after week and even year after years he stood feeding a machine with wood.IMG_9029 2

You see I’m not really an amateur in the sense of part time, nor a hobbyist in the sense of not having to earn my living and support a family, I am and always was a man who worked hard, diligently, full-time, most time to support and provide in a single wage. It was a joint choice between me and my wife. We both chose that. It wasn’t that my wife didn’t work it was that we were indeed partners for a lifetime together in this thing called life and we wanted to spend as much time in our lives jointly together without selling ourselves to a company. Guess what??? It worked. We’ve spent our lives working together and living together and travelling together, raising our five children together and guess another what??? We neither of us went to to higher education, neither of us had a career and we both feel a sense of wonder and fulfilment, contentment and happiness.IMG_9016 2 - Version 2

When I worked the industrial world it was a small step. I bought a small bandsaw I liked. Then I bought a DeWalt radial arm saw and several times almost lost a hand. What a dangerous machine that is. As I gathered more machines I became industrial, respected, admired. I mass made things and step by step I started losing my love for work and for my craft. I suppose this is a true thing here, I never felt more lost and alone than when I was standing at a router table shoving wood into it. Eyes covered with protective lenses, ears isolating me from life, the dust mask and the noise separated me from life itself. Spindle moulders hummed all the more with a monstrous power compared to routers and the air moved rapidly surrounding the machine air I was breathing despite my mask. I ached to take it all off. I recall days when my lungs coughed up black stuff, when I was a younger man because the bosses only gave us a surgical mask. Idris Owen was a wretched man, a conservative MP and a massive snob of a man who was a disgrace of a man and to his father’s hard-earned name. He drove in in a Rolls Royce Silver Cloud and would not buy masks or any extractors for the men at work. IMG_9050There were days when the shop was so thick with dust; oak, mahogany, even asbestos, we could scarcely see one another. One day I rebelled and said I would never work for another man again and apart from an odd time of shortage I have stayed within an engineered lifestyle I put together piece by piece just like the pieces of furniture I build; solid, dovetailed, tenoned and pegged. I bought oak from small mills and shared conversations with the millers on purpose so I would know his family, his wife and his children. I saw them born and I made many a casket for their parents and even their babies stillborn. I dovetailed the corners and created a place of peace and rest at the close of their lives. I’ve made these things alongside the fine pieces where I sometimes see President Obama leaning on them or standing by them in the Cabinet Room of the White House. I don’t like to think that some people are on a conveyor belt that they can’t get off that has nothing to do with woodworking at all but has the same soul-destroying effect. But indeed I know they are and they are searching for the same way out I was once searching for and found. Many are following the blog these days that search for their own way out. The keyboard lost its spark after just a few months in the “real world” the nerve endings were sending signals but they ignored them at forst. The aching wrists and the fingers and then the fabric became scratchier on their wrists, soon painful. Before long they had something called carpal tunnel syndrome. A syndrome??? An abnormal coincidence of events occurring at one time. You know what? Going off the amount of emails and messages and texts and such that I get, there are thousands upon thousands of people who know something’s very wrong and they cannot, they cannot make the change. But that’s why we say what we say and do what we do in anticipation that one day change will come and we are paving the way in thought and deed and it will mean much to many and they will step by step have found changes that made the difference to their wellbeing and they will be building skills that are outside the remit of mass-manufacturing and mass-media and mass-education and mass-sterility. They will be creating a life they can live in and live with and share with and create an alternative reality.PICT0031

A man said to me last week when I had a nine-day class that he could no longer work because he became ill from computerised living. Imagine that. He could not work. He found that he had tight breath the whole day long for fears and realities of industrial pressures inside him. How would he survive? Earn a living? He kept going until something snapped. The day came when he could no longer function and he felt he had failed on many fronts. He had to face family and friends, colleagues and associates, bosses and so on. He was highly gifted, highly skilled yet this day brought him to his knees. I know people that feel this way but they have children and wives and family and friends and they must keep face. There is no alternative for them you see because politicians and educationalists and global industrialists don’t understand what makes a man and a woman tick. They don’t understand that there is a ticking clock in every person and that something inside them says I must be worth something more than this, surely!PICT0380_2

So I write my blog not to compare a machine to a hand tool but to question why choose a mass manufacturing method if you really love woodworking? I write it to say you will find greater levels of fulfilment if you do it yourself whether you use a machine or your hand skills. Do I care if some prefer machines to hand tools. No, I just never liked my life as a machinist and saw that about 80% of woodworkers felt the same way, felt intimidated and even felt like they should push themselves to accept the machine as some sort of badge of merit if they could just conquer the anxieties and intimidation. You see they just couldn’t find the mentor to show them the alternative and that’s why I do it. It’s because I think it brings healing to many a weary soul somewhere, anywhere, that just spends every day bored to death feeling they are mindlessly punching keys on a keyboard, or stacking shelves or pushing stop and start buttons on an assembly line and I do it in the hope that it does have deeper meaning to some who can see that it’s nothing to do with speed and efficiency but quality of life and love and care. I post to inspire and write to encourage and know you think about these things yourselves.

The post More Meaning Beyond Machining and Hand Work appeared first on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

5 Good Articles for $3.99

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 1:39pm

The Popular Woodworking Magazine editors have assembled a short “e-mag” of five of my most popular articles from the magazine that you can download for $3.99 from ShopWoodworking.com. Titled “The Best of Christopher Schwarz,” here’s what you get: The Dutch Tool Chest (small and large versions) This is a fantastic tool chest that I’ve used all over North America. It holds a shocking amount of tools, keeps them handy to […]

The post 5 Good Articles for $3.99 appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

Observations On A Craftsman (Part One)

The English Woodworker - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 10:56am

wooden planes_1In our previous workshop time had allowed us to create a systematic approach to building workbenches. The fine tuned layout allowed the work to flow like a human driven conveyor belt; from timber entering through the door to passing over machines, and as the wood traveled physically from the front the the back of the workshop it became progressively more workbench shaped.
Richard and I are close. We live together, work together and would certainly consider each other best friends. Through this I have always had a very clear understanding of how he works and can anticipate which process will come next and when he will be in need of assistance.
Distractions are a big bug bear of working for yourself, and so knowing when to keep out of each others way is often more important than offering help. This works both ways and has been learnt from the devastation of many morning’s plans after a mere innocent line of gossip over a pot of tea.

When we moved workshop recently we anticipated a considerable settling in period. We’re long enough in the tooth to know that you can’t iron out every crease in production just by thinking things through. You have to allow some things to trip you up before you give them your full attention.
The dynamics of the workspace have changed now and through this I have observed one or two of Richard’s weird ways which I hadn’t noted before. In this smaller space the bench components no longer travel along the workshop, but remain almost stationery and appear to grow and form organically as tools are brought over in precise sequence. Richard is a very patient sort of person; generous and helpful if you need anything. But my observation of late is that he is possessive. Not selfish or greedy in the slightest, but oh so protective of his workspace.

Observation of the week: Do not move a craftsman’s tools.

Categories: Hand Tools

Every Precious Little Thing

Inside the Oldwolf Workshop - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 7:55am
Not every project requires the precious precision of the persnickety.

I started woodworking in the late '90's, a carry over from buying a house and teaching myself to do some home DIY renovations. A little over a year later, after the passing of my wife's grandmother, I was told I could take whatever I wanted from her grandpa Setles's tool collection. (He had passed away several years before)

Anything I didn't take was to be sold at auction and so I grabbed many things, whether I knew how to use them or not.

Setles was not a woodworker, he was a tinkerer, a fixer, and a maker. The tools spanned from automotive to woodworking to blacksmithing. Tools weren't super precious or overly cared for, they were used and used hard and if they broke, you saved them to scavenge the parts from to fix something else. The man never threw away a screw or bolt if he didn't need to. and if he needed a shelf to store things on he didn't head down to Pier One Imports and buy one. He tore apart a pallet he picked up for free and built one.

One wall of his shop was lined with these pallet wood shelves. The wood still rough sawn and raw with no finish or paint save what was spilled or splattered. (There must have been a hell of an accident with some light green paint at one point, it was splattered around like a Jackson Pollack, including spots on a lot of the tools.) The shelves were well built. dovetailed corners and dadoed shelves.

I knew enough about woodworking to think I could pick out the mistakes he made. The big one I saw was the dovetailed corners were oriented wrong if you consider a hanging shelf. Set to hold the sides instead of resisting the forces of gravity.

A little while ago I decided I needed a shelf in the winter shop and I thought fondly about the shelves in Setles's garage. The spirit of Furniture Of Necessity. (Can't wait for Chris's upcoming book) With no collection of old pallets to draw from (they don't make those like they used to either) I picked up a couple standard grade pine 1x8 boards and proceeded to knock out the shelf in a quick evening in the shop.

Complete with dovetails facing the "wrong" direction and reinforced with wire finishing nails.

I shot some time lapse of the first half of the evening.


I owe Setles and his mismatch tool collection a huge debt. In the car full of tools I carted home was the saws and #5 Stanley that got me thinking "You know, I should figure out how to use those things." It took me a few years of looking at them to make that decision but look where I am now!

Now I have to decide whether to Jackson Pollack the shelf with paint of let that happen organically.

Ratione et Passionis
Oldwolf
Categories: General Woodworking

Introducing Othie the shopdog

Design Matters - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 7:10am

Jim Tolpin has an incredible woodshop and a shop dog named Othie.  Recently, Jim’s been working with Andrea Love to create a short animated clip of the work that the two of us have been exploring the past six years. Our book By Hand & Eye is the product of that journey into the world of traditional design. Take a look at Jim’s shop and his marvelous shop dog.

Enjoy.

 

George R. Walker


Fun, fun woodworking video

She Works Wood - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 7:09am
Categories: General Woodworking

RWW 192 Bent Lamination Clocks

The Renaissance Woodworker - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 6:31am

Get Woodworking Week 2015Bent lamination clocksFor Get Woodworking Week I like to do a simple project that is approachable by anyone but also one that makes a strong statement. Your non woodworking friends will look at these bent lamination desk clocks and think you are some kind of magician. The reality is it is a really easy project and a lot of fun.

This design comes straight from the pages of WOOD magazine issue 182 and I want to thank Lucas Peters for partnering with me and making the full article including full sized pattern available for download. Please visit the links below the video for the article but also the hardware and veneer kits through their partner Schlabaugh & Sons. I hope you will make a clock or two and I’d love to see it when you do.

Plans & Hardware

Categories: Hand Tools

A Home Made Centreing Tool

Chris Schwarz's Pop Wood Blog - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 6:29am

Author’s note: No, I haven’t gone all English or Canadian on you. The above headline is from the April 1925 edition of The Woodworker, my favorite old woodworking magazine. I enjoy reading magazines that were printed when hand tools still held sway in the home workshop. Below is a fantastic little centreing jig you can build in a few minutes from shop scraps. — Christopher Schwarz A CENTREING TOOL — […]

The post A Home Made Centreing Tool appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: Hand Tools

‘By Hand & Eye’ the Holiday Special

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 4:49am

You’ve read the book. Now see the movie.

Animator Andrea Love and Jim Tolpin, one of the authors of “By Hand & Eye,” have produced a charming stop-motion video that explains the pre-industrial design process explored in the book. If you like the Rankin/Bass Christmas specials from the 1970s (“Year Without a Santa Claus” and “Rudolph and Frosty’s Christmas in July”) you’ll dig this video.

In it, Jim’s puppet explains how to design a stepstool using the size of your body, basic proportions and a little humor (I love the Vitruvian Dog).

It’s a great little film that Andrea and Jim have been working on for a long time. Enjoy!

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: By Hand & Eye
Categories: Hand Tools

Today’s Article – Fundamentals of Woodworking: Plane Exercises

360 WoodWorking - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 4:10am
Novice woodworkers often ask how to develop skills with a hand plane. The resurgence of hand-tool woodworking over the last decade has brought these timeless tools to the forefront again. And, while they are not difficult to use, the learning curve for proficiency is greater than that of their corded counterparts. In today’s article (available […]

Pennsylvania Spice Cabinet

The Unplugged Woodshop - Tom Fidgen - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 4:10am
  After last week’s rant about using dividers to avoid numbers, I thought I would take a picture of the marking and measuring tools that I have laying around my shop.     A full set of draftsman’s curves.  (A French curve would be very...
Categories: Hand Tools

WORK No. 153 - Published February 20, 1892

Work Magazine Reprint Project - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 4:00am



Careful out there this week ladies and gents.




ARTICLES FOUND IN THIS ISSUE:
DESIGN FOR A CHESS TABLE

PRACTICAL PAPERS FOR SMITHS

SCARF ORNAMENTS

A WARMING PAN

ABOUT LANDING NETS

MODE OF LENGTHENING A REVOLVER SIGHT FOR LONG-DISTANCE SHOOTING

SHORT LESSONS IN WINDOW MAKING

MANDOLINE MATTERS

SHORT LESSONS IN WOOD-WORKING FOR AMATEURS

OUR GUIDE TO GOOD THINGS

SHOP



Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 152 •




Categories: Hand Tools

WORK No. 152 - Published February 13, 1892

Work Magazine Reprint Project - Fri, 02/20/2015 - 4:00am












ARTICLES FOUND IN THIS ISSUE:
DESIGN FOR A CHESS TABLE

PRACTICAL PAPERS FOR SMITHS

SCARF ORNAMENTS

A WARMING PAN

ABOUT LANDING NETS

MODE OF LENGTHENING A REVOLVER SIGHT FOR LONG-DISTANCE SHOOTING

SHORT LESSONS IN WINDOW MAKING

MANDOLINE MATTERS

SHORT LESSONS IN WOOD-WORKING FOR AMATEURS

OUR GUIDE TO GOOD THINGS

SHOP



Disclaimer: Articles in Work describe materials and methods that would not be considered safe or advisable today. We are not responsible for the content of these magazines, and cannot take any responsibility for anyone attempting projects or procedures described therein.
The first issue of Work was published on March 23rd, 1889. The goal of this project is to release digital copies of the individual issues starting on the same date in 2012, effectively republishing the materials 123 years to the day from their original release.
The original printing was on thin, inexpensive paper. There are many cases of uneven inking and bleed-through from the page behind. Our copies of Work come from bound library volumes of these issues and are subject to unfavorable trimming, missing covers, etc. To minimize harm to these fragile volumes, we've undertaken the task of scanning the books ourselves. We do considerable post processing of the scans to make them clear but please bear with us if a margin is clipped too close, or a few words are unreadable. We would like to thank James Vasile and Karl Fogel for their help in supplying us with a book scanner and generally enabling this project to get off the ground.
You are welcome to download, print, and pretty much do what you want with the scan for your own personal purposes. Feel free to post a link or a copy on your blog or website. All we ask is a link back to the original project and this blog. We are not answering requests for commercial downloads or reprinting at this time.


• Click to Download Vol.3 - No. 152 •




Categories: Hand Tools

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by Dr. Radut