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Chair scrape made for Paul Hamler You Tube channel

Hamler Tools - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 9:28am


Easy style chair scrape made with a few common hand tools.
Categories: Hand Tools

A small barn for the summer house 9, painting the windows.

Mulesaw - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 8:21am
After preparing all the individual pieces for the windows, they were assembled. I used a plane for adjusting the size to a pleasing reveal all around each one of them.
The flat parts of each window were also smoothed with a plane, to ease any small differences from the manufacturing.

I consulted Olav for some advice, and he suggested that the traditional way to go would be to coat the rabbet for the glass twice with shellac prior to painting and adding glaziers putty. The reason behind this approach should be that the shellac keeps the putty "soft" longer, because it prevents the linseed oil from migrating from the chalk and into the wood. 

While I am not be someone who dives into testing new stuff, I am normally ready to try out something old and tested straight away. So I took Olavs advice and used up the remaining shellac mixture I had left over from the travelling bookcases.
While I was at it, I also coated all the knots with shellac.

The hardware for the windows look good in my opinion, but it is the most traditional way to cover it in paint as well, that actually made painting a bit easier, since I shouldn't try to avoid getting paint anywhere.
For the painting itself I have strapped a frame to the workbench and mounted the windows on it. That way I didn't have to invent any work holding for the painted windows. The outside of each frame will not be painted since it will be hidden inside the wall. So it seems to be a fairly efficient way of doing it.

The biggest obstacle was Bertha who found it incredible interesting that I was mowing a small paint brush up and down, so she came close to have a look. I managed to get her ushered away with only a few white parts on her coat of fur.

Complete window.

one large and two small windows painted.

Inside corner with shellac applied.

Categories: Hand Tools

Making My Straightedge

Paul Sellers - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 8:01am

Friday 10th February 2017 I made my first straightedge from oak, an offcut scrap but quarter-sawn nonetheless. That one’s still in the US somewhere. Today I use another made also from oak and yet another offcut scrap. Mostly I’ve kept them shorter than say four feet long because I have a spirit level that’s 122cm (48″) …

Read the full post Making My Straightedge on Paul Sellers' Blog.

Categories: Hand Tools

Tips from Sticks in the Mud – March 2017 – Tip #2 – Twist Ties

Highland Woodworking - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 7:00am

No Southern-fried Southern boy wants to be called a Yankee, but we share the characteristics of shrewdness and thrift. Thus, each month we include a money-saving tip. It’s OK if you call me “cheap.

When you purchase a new garden hose it comes with some really long twist ties. Forget those little things that come on your bag of bread, I’ve seen some over a foot long. Save them.

This new garden hose has three very long twist ties that I will save for many future handy uses.

Twist ties can even be used to hold, well, twist ties.

Long twist ties are worth having around for organizing all kinds of things around the shop, from wires that need arranging to those little flags AT&T put all over your yard when they ran your new phone cable (and cut the TV cable with the Ditch Witch).

Don’t ever throw these little flags away, they can be so handy! Once, I needed to dig a winding drainage ditch. Nature had already shown me the path the water wanted to take. To accommodate its natural tendency, and make sure I didn’t go off course, I put flags in the ground on that natural path to make it completely clear where I needed to dig. Not only is there no point in buying flags, but when the time comes that you need them, you won’t want to have to stop what you’re doing to go to the hardware store.

This big roll of electrical cable could be wrapped with two zip ties joined together. but there is no need to waste those expensive little buggers. One of these (free) twist ties will go around the whole thing.

Maybe you need to temporarily hang a power cord from the ceiling. Loop and twist around a screw in the ceiling, then loop and twist around the cord. Problem solved!

If the cord is too heavy for a twist tie, use a coat hanger. Stretched out straight, one end can go on the ceiling screw, the other around the cord.

For a more permanent solution, like this outdoor spot where I do a lot of sanding, I’ve used screw hooks permanently installed in the joists of the deck overhead. I can manage an entire 100-foot extension cord with none lying on the table in my way.

And, when you just need a little encouragement, nothing fills the bill like a pelican. In the absence of a pelican, a cat like Max makes a great stand-in.

Jim Randolph is a veterinarian in Long Beach, Mississippi. His earlier careers as lawn mower, dairy farmer, automobile mechanic, microwave communications electronics instructor and journeyman carpenter all influence his approach to woodworking. His favorite projects are furniture built for his wife, Brenda, and for their children and grandchildren. His and Brenda’s home, nicknamed Sticks-In-The-Mud, is built on pilings (sticks) near the wetlands (mud) on a bayou off Jourdan River. His shop is in the lower level of their home.Questions and comments on woodworking may be written below in the comments section. Questions about pet care should be directed to his blog on pet care, www.MyPetsDoctor.com. We regret that, because of high volume, not all inquiries can be answered personally.

The post Tips from Sticks in the Mud – March 2017 – Tip #2 – Twist Ties appeared first on Woodworking Blog.

Categories: General Woodworking

Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event March 10-11, Greater Cincinnati

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 6:39am

The Popular Woodworking team is looking forward to the end of this week – instead of reporting to the office for work on Friday morning, we’ll be meeting bright and early at Braxton Brewing Co. to set up for the 2017 Greater Cincinnati Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event. I’ll be there Saturday as well…but perhaps not bright nor early – but by 10 a.m. for sure! (That’s when the doors open […]

The post Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event March 10-11, Greater Cincinnati appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

News! Don Williams to Attend the Lie-Nielsen Event

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 5:12am

don_l1010023

Don Williams, the author of “Virtuoso” and the ringleader of the A.J. Roubo translations, will attend the Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event this weekend at Braxton Brewing in Covington, Ky.

Don will be signing books and (no doubt) spreading his wisdom on historical finishing techniques. So bring your copies of “Virtuoso” and Roubo translations. If you ordered the standard edition of “Roubo on Furniture” you’ll receive it this week. They all went out in the mail late last week.

img_6470-copy narayan2_IMG_0160

And Don isn’t the only Lost Art Press author who will be attending the Lie-Nielsen event this weekend. Narayan Nayar, the photographer for “Virtuoso,” will be there. And Matt Bickford, the author of “Mouldings in Practice,” will be demonstrating both days.

I’ll be there. And, as you know, I’ll sign anything. So bring your books.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Spoon carving straight from the tree

Steve Tomlin Crafts - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 1:56am
If you thought carving wooden spoons was just for men with beards, you need to see this post. Continue reading
Categories: General Woodworking

plane iron storage......

Accidental Woodworker - Mon, 03/06/2017 - 12:34am
It was 7 frigging degrees fahrenheit this morning when I woke up. For the non imperial guys, that is minus 13.3 celsius. It is march 5th and we have single digit temperatures before the sun rises. As cold as it was there wasn't any frost on the truck or car. But I did have frost on the inside of the back screen door.  Tomorrow is supposed to get close to 60°F (15.5°C). I guess the in like a lion and out like lamb is playing out now.

chunk of ash
There are 13 dadoes for the iron storage and I didn't want to make it in a softwood. I also didn't want to make it in a wider piece of hardwood. This was the smallest piece of ash I had and I think the width is just right.

backed up the first one
I moved the first dado back to 1 1/2" so I had room to get my hand in here to take it out. First dado is done for the 10 1/2.

2nd dado
I knifed a line and sawed down on them. I'm using this also as an exercise in sawing to a line. I didn't do so good on the first one. The walls are pretty straight but I overshot the depth.

removing the waste with a 1/8" chisel
I did the removal from both sides. I made a vee coming from the bottom going to the top. I kept at it until I flattened it out.

back side of the saw cut
I was trying to end my saw cuts on the gauge line and I did ok on the majority of them. The backsides of the saw cut wandered a bit off the line. Overall, over the 26 saw cuts, they were fairly straight and plumb.

used the saw cuts for the chiseling depth
I couldn't find a router with a 1/8" cutter. LN makes a 3/32" iron as does Lee Valley. Lee Valley makes a 1/16" cutter but neither makes a 1/8" one. This depth isn't critical in that it needs to be dead nuts flat. Close to flat with no rocking is what I'm shooting for.

gave up on the saw cuts
2 done with 11 to go. Already made a change in the spacing. My layout had 3/8" between the dadoes and I changed it 1/2". I found it easier to use the iron themselves to see how flat the bottom was.. The smallest little bump will make them rock.

how I got the dado depth
I set the gauge to be a frog hair under the screw. The 10 1/2 and the #3 were the same, the rest of the irons were all different.

#3 above, this is a 4 1/2"
Each iron increased roughly an 1/8" over the proceeding ones.

it's a rocking
Leveling the bottoms of the dadoes turned out to be much easier to do than I thought it would be. I was able to do all 13 without any major hiccups. I know this one is too high because of the screw. That should be a lot closer to the top of the dado.

two more to do
I have some empty dado slots but they should be filled up next week. I found and ordered two more #4 irons and chipbreakers and a couple of #3 chipbreakers. That will give me 3 iron/chipbreakers to swap out on them. I also ordered a #8 chipbreaker for the solo #8 iron.

I got this many irons because I hate to sharpen. It always seems too that the need to sharpen comes right in the middle of something. With at least two irons for each plane (except for the 10 1/2), I can swap out the dull iron and put in a fresh sharpened one.

my depth gauge
The line on the board is the top of the drawer.  This is the #8 iron and I am just under the wire. The two dadoes for the #8 irons were the deepest ones I had to do.

first hiccup
My saw cut for the LN iron is tapered. It fits on the left side but is a very tight fit on the right.

hiccup #2
The second dado isn't tapered, it's too narrow and the iron won't fit at all. I couldn't find a file or rasp to fit in the dado so I could widen it. Had a crazy thought to chisel the end grain but the chisel wouldn't fit neither. I fixed the two of them on the tablesaw.

they fit snug now
the lineup minus the new kids coming
where they are going to live
A quick couple of in and outs with the drawer and the irons were still in place. (I fixed the one tilted 4 1/2 iron)

cut hazard
I could put the sharp end going the other way up against the drawer side but I like it this way.

need a fence here
it's sharp
I am going to mold the top edge of the fence so it isn't just a square edge.

anointed with blood
rounded over the top edge
this turned out pretty good
screwed it in place from the bottom
The fence is just screwed in place with no glue. I don't won't this to be permanent case I want to change it down the road.

can't screw this
The back is for future expansion so I don't know if a screw will be in the way.  I could put one at the front but I may want to do something there too. I like having this without screws and nails to work around so I had to think of another way of securing this.

OBG and rub blocks
using a practice astragal molding
I sawed this off the board and then sawed off four pieces to use as rub blocks.

done
I put two blocks at the front and back. That iron holder is a snug fit front to back so the four  rub blocks should keep it from moving.

This is all I did in the shop today. I planned on setting the kitchen sink cabinet but that didn't happen neither. Instead I slept and watched a couple of my DVDs on planes.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Who was Major Walter C Winfield?
answer - He created Sphairistikè in 1873 which became the modern game of tennis

New Stickers This Week

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 12:53pm
948749 948750 948751

 

My daughter Maddy will begin mailing out a new set of stickers this week. She ran out of the previous design last week, so if your SASE is in transit you likely will receive the new designs.

The new stickers include:

  1. A round sticker with the Lost Art Press emblem and the “farting divider,” as some people have called it.
  2. A die-cut sticker in the shape of the English A-square from the cover of “The Anarchist’s Tool Chest.”
  3. A full-color portrait of A.J. Roubo to commemorate the release of “With All the Precision Possible: Roubo on Furniture.”

Want a set? You can order them from her etsy store here.

Or, for customers in the United States, you can send a $5 bill and a SASE (self-addressed stamped envelope) to Maddy at:

Stick it to the Man
P.O. Box 3284
Columbus, OH 43210

As always, this is not a money-making venture for me or Lost Art Press. All profits help Maddy squeak through college without debt. Also, as her 21st birthday is coming up on March 22, some of that money might go to buying cider.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

In memory of Steve LaMantia

In memoria di Steve LaMantia




Maybe Steve LaMantia's name does not mean anything to you, but you surely know the thing that he gave a name to: the Scary Sharp (with the TradeMark symbol of the course).
Steve has recently passed away and although I do not know him personally, I have often used the scary sharp method and so I am glad to remember him with an article I wrote four years ago.
In Italian only, sorry.

Forse il nome Steve LaMantia non vi dice niente, ma sicuramente conoscete la cosa a cui lui ha dato un nome: lo Scary Sharp (con il simbolo del TradeMark ovviamente).
Steve è recentemente scomparso e anche se io non lo conoscevo personalmente, ho usato spesso il metodo scary sharp e quindi mi fa piacere ricordarlo con un articolo che scrissi 4 anni fa.


+++++++


Un'affilatura da urlo


Era il Novembre del 1995 quando un tale di nome Steve LaMantia scriveva un messaggio sul newsgroup (gli antesignani degli odierni forum) rec.woodworking, descrivendo il suo inconsueto metodo di affilatura. Riassumendo molto, egli aveva sostituito alle pietre e alle coti, alcune striscie di carta vetrata di grana via via più sottile incollate su una lastra di vetro. Egli chiamò quel metodo "sandpaper sharpening", ma concluse scherzosamente il messaggio scrivendo che con quel metodo le sue lame erano diventate paurosamente affilate, "scary sharp", e da allora quel termine entrò nell'uso collettivo per indicare l'affilatura ottenuta per mezzo delle carte abrasive.

Da quel giorno è passata molta acqua sotto i ponti. Sullo scary sharp si sono scritti fiumi di parole che trovate facilmente con Google e torrenti di filmati che trovate su YouTube. Mi scuso per queste banali figure retoriche fluviali, ma probabilmente sono stato influenzato da questa primavera particolrmente piovosa.
Inoltre in questi anni sono stati sviluppati nuovi supporti abrasivi, sempre più efficaci ed efficienti. Ma lo scary sharp è in fondo ancora quello di allora: utilizzare le carte abrasive fissate su un supporto piano e rigido, in luogo delle pietre e delle coti.

Questo metodo presenta dei vantaggi e degli svantaggi rispetto agli altri sistemi. Facciamo, per esempio, un contronto con le pietre ad acqua giapponesi (japanese waterstones), che sono uno dei mezzi attualmente più utilizzati.

Il costo è sicuramente l'aspetto più evidente dello scary sharp: con un piccolo investimento iniziale si riescono ad ottenere affilature di qualità pari a quelle ottenibili con un set di pietre giapponesi che possono costare anche diverse centinaia di euro.
Quindi, da questo punto di vista, è sicuramente il miglior metodo per il neofita o per chi non deve affilare quotidianamente i propri ferri. Se invece dovete affilare frequentemente, sul lungo periodo le pietre diventano più convenienti.

Un secondo vantaggio dello scary sharp, ma che per importanza io metterei al primo posto, è che mentre le pietre giapponesi con l'uso si concavizzano e vanno ri-spianate con regolarità, il supporto delle carte abrasive, che solitamente è una spessa lastra di vetro, rimane sempre piano.

Il terzo vantaggio dello scary sharp è il passaggio più graduale da una grana all'altra, che diminuisce i tempi di affilatura. Mi spiego meglio: nelle pietre giapponesi, le particelle abrasive che si fratturano nel processo di affilatura e diventano inservibili, si staccano dalla pietra e vengono spinte via grazie al movimento dei ferri e all'acqua in sospensione, lasciando il posto alle nuove e fresche particelle abrasive sottostanti. La granulometria delle pietre è quindi costante.
Nelle carte abrasive invece, c'è un solo strato utile e le particelle abrasive che vengono frantumate diventano di grana più fine. La granulometria delle carte abrasive è quindi decrementale e il passaggio da una carta di grana grossa ad una di grana più fine è più dolce.

Infine c'è il fattore "rottura di scatole": le pietre, una volta acquistate e riposte in una bacinella d'acqua sono subito pronte pronte all'uso, invece con le carte abrasive, bisogna ritagliarle, preparare il supporto, incollarle o fissarle in qualche altra maniera al supporto e spesso quando viene il momento di usarle ci si accorge che ce ne manca qualcuna e quindi bisogna telefonare a Cristian per farsele spedire urgentemente.

Analizzata la teoria e se l'avete saltata non vi biasimo, vediamo di addentrarci nella pratica.
Come ho già anticipato più volte, lo scary sharp non è altro che l'uso di fogli di carta abrasiva di grana sempre più fine fissati in qualche maniera che vedremo ad un supporto il più possibile piatto e rigido.
Quest'ultimo può essere un pezzo di MDF o di truciolare melaminico di forte spessore, una lastra di marmo, un piano da rettifica in ghisa o in granito o un IPad, ma quello più spesso utilizzato è una lastra di vetro di almeno 1 cm. di spessore.

Per fissare le carte al supporto si può utilizzare la colla spray rimovibile. Si può usare anche dello scotch biadesivo, a patto che non sia spugnoso altrimenti, comprimendosi, rischia di arrotondare il filo degli utensili. Con alcune carte, come quelle che vedremo in seguito, si può sfruttare l'effetto ventosa creato dalla tensione superficiale dell'acqua.

Le carte vetrate utilizzabili per lo scary sharp, sono tutte quelle con un substrato rigido, tipo carta o plastica. Si va dalle carte vetrate comuni e grossolane che utilizzano come abrasivo il Carburo di Silicio, fino ai poliesteri abrasivi con polveri diamantate superfini utilizzate nelle applicazioni ottiche, passando per le carte abrasive di medio-fini che si usano in carrozzeria. Meglio evitare le carte telate o quelle con substrato spugnoso perchè, come suggerito sopra, comprimendosi tendono ad arrotondare il filo delle lame.

Le grane da utilizzare dipendono dalla situazione di partenza e dal grado di affilatura che si vuole ottenere.
Per i lavori di sgrosso, per esempio per aggiustare una lama sbeccata o per modificare l'angolatura del bisello, si può partire da una carta P100 e proseguire per gradi successivi fino dove si desidera, volendo anche alla grana P9000, in cui le particelle abrasive hanno una dimensione di 0.5 micron, che corrisponde approssitivamente ad una pietra giapponese di grana 20000.

Questo pressapochismo nelle equivalenze tra le varie scale che definiscono le granulometrie degli abrasivi è dovuto al fatto che i diversi istituti mondiali che definiscono gli standard, utilizzano dei sistemi di misurazioni diversi. Esistono alcune tabelle di conversione, ma non sono sempre chiare e coerenti tra loro.

Per chiarire ancora meglio in cosa consiste il metodo scary sharp, vediamo un esempio di affilatura eseguita con i 3M Lapping Films.

I 3M Lapping Films sono dei fogli di poliestere spessi 0.075 mm, cosparsi elettrostaticamente di particelle di ossido di alluminio e successivamente fissate con resina. Sono disponibili in varie granulometrie e sono stati inizialmente sviluppati per lavorazioni su fibre ottiche, sui dischi di memoria o per la lappatura piana in metallografia.

Le dimensioni dei fogli sono 215x280 mm (più o meno come un foglio A4) e si possono tagliare in strisce a seconda delle proprie esigenze.

Per fissare le stisce alla lastra di vetro, si può anche usare come al solito la colla spray, ma una particolarità di questi fogli in poliestere è che basta un po' d'acqua per creare l'effetto ventosa necessario per farli stare fermi durante l'uso. Si spruzza un po' d'acqua sulla lastra di vetro e poi si comprimono i fogli facendo uscire tutte le bollicine d'aria e l'acqua in eccesso e a quel punto i fogli rimarranno fermi durante l'affilatura. Così non c'è nemmeno bisogno di usare un solvente per togliere la colla rimasta sulla lastra.


Siccome le lame che ho utilizzato avevano bisogno soltanto di un'affilatura ordinaria, nel senso che non presentavano sbeccature o altri gravi difetti che avrebbero necessatato delle carte vetrate più grossolane, sono partito direttamente con i fogli da 30 micron, quelli di colore verde scuro. Facendo una media tra le varie scale di conversione, questi fogli corrispondono ad una pietra ad acqua di grana tra 400 e 500 oppure ad una carta vetrata P500.



Ho bagnato la lastra di vetro, ho steso la striscia con la parte lucida verso il basso, ho spruzzato un po' d'acqua sulla striscia e poi, tenendo la striscia con due dita, con la prima passata ho "strizzato" l'acqua in eccesso presente sotto la striscia in modo che si "incollasse" al vetro e ho iniziato col movimento avanti-indietro. Tra l'altro, essendo le striscie un po' più lunghe delle pietre tradizionali, ogni "corsa" è più produttiva rispetto alle pietre.


Quando ho cominciato a sentire la bava sul dorso ho dato una qualche passata anche a quest'ultimo e sono passato alla striscia di colore giallo, quella da 12 micron, che corrisponde più o meno ad una pietra ad acqua di grana tra 1000 e 1200 oppure ad una carta vetrata P1500.



Poi, seguendo la stessa procedura, sono passato alla striscia azzurra che ha una grana di 9 Micron, corrispondente alle pietre ad acqua con grana tra 1500 e 2000 o alle carte vetrate P2000.



Infine ho ultimato la procedura con la striscia verde chiara da 1 micron, corrispondente alle pietre ad acqua con grana tra 12000 e 20000 o alle carte vetrate P6000, raggiungendo un'affilatura a specchio, che come potete vedere ha prodotto dei risultati eccellenti. Da paura!


La durata dell'abrasivo dipende da molti fattori (come per esempio la durezza dell'acciaio, la larghezza della lama, lo spessore del bisello e le condizioni di partenza) ed è quindi difficile da calcolare, ma tanto per avere un'idea, con una sola serie di strisce ho affilato agevolmente tre pialle.


Categories: Hand Tools

Staked High Stool

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 10:38am

staked_bench3_img_4451

I didn’t intend to start revising or adding to “The Anarchist’s Design Book,” but new designs are gushing out of my sketchbook these days, so I’ve stopped resisting.

This stool design started with a Welsh stool from the 18th century and came together in two days. It needs a second prototype to reach the finish line, but it’s good enough to show. Here are some details if you are interested in designing your own.

The stool is 25-1/2” tall, which is perfect for me. I can sit on the bench with my feet resting flat on the floor. The stretcher is 6-3/4” off the floor, so when I put my feet on it, my legs are in a traditional sitting arrangement.

staked_bench2_img_4448

The seat is 1-3/4” x 12” x 20”. This gives you enough depth so you don’t feel as if you are falling off and you won’t cut off blood circulation to your legs if you sit back on the seat. (Also, 12” is a classic stool depth.) The 20” length is suited so you can place your hands on the seat to either side of your torso. This allows you to easily reposition yourself or to help give you a push if you wish to hop off the seat.

The 45° cuts at the back remove weight – visual and literal.

The legs are 1-3/4” double-tapered octagons and start life about 27” long. The double tapers meet at the point where the stretchers intersect the legs – a natural place for bulk. The front legs use the following angles: 26° sightline and 13° resultant. The rear leg has a 0° sightline and 22° resultant. These angles give the stool immense stability.

staked_bench1_img_4445

The legs have 1-1/4” diameter tenons at the top. They start out about 2” long. The tenons are not tapered on this design.

The stretchers start as 1-1/8” octagons and are turned. The front stretcher is a cigar shape and terminates at each end with a cove and a 5/8” diameter x 1” tenon. The T-stretcher is 1-1/8” diameter at the rear leg and tapers to 3/4” at the front stretcher. Both ends have 5/8”-diameter tenons. (Note I swiped this tapered tenon from Bern Chandley, a chairmaker in Melbourne, Australia.)

What am I going to change for Stool 2.0? I’m going to add a wide and flat chamfer all around the top of the seat and saddle the seat. I’m going to bulk up the legs and stretchers a bit to see what happens. I might replace the 45° angles on the seat to ellipses.

But the second prototype will have to wait. I have tea coasters (yes, coasters) to build for a special client.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: The Anarchist's Design Book, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

# 12 - screws - Schrauben

Old Ladies - Pedder's blog - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 8:49am
After a lot of testdrilling I made the holes for the screws in the spine. Phew! (Drilling exactly isn't the talent of me nor my drill jig.)

Nach vielen versuchen habe ich mich getraut, die Löcher in fen Giff zu bohren. Das ist nicht gerade meine Hauptbegabung (und auch nicht die meines Bohrständers).
Die M6 Schrauben warten noch auf das richtige Gewinde (12-24 UNC).

The m6 screws waiting for the correct pitch (12-24 UNC).
But it is enough to test the plane

Aber es reicht um den Hobel zu testen.
Um den Lack von der Platte zu holen habe ich dann aber sicherheitshalber doch den #80 genommen.

Took the #80 to do most of the work in definishing this table. Didn't want to risk to use the #12.
These plan save my lungs from a lot of potential sawdust.

Diese Hobel bewahren meine Lungen vor einer Menge Schleifstaub.
Categories: Hand Tools

Lie-Nielsen Event: Where to Eat & Drink

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 7:12am
otto_img_5730

Shrimp and grits at Otto’s.

There are a lot of great places to eat in Cincinnati and Covington, and I’m not talking about chili parlors. In fact, the only thing I’m going to say about chili parlors is this: They are the only place you can order a “child’s three-way” and not get arrested.

To make this list manageable, I’m going to focus only on establishments that are in Covington and downtown Cincinnati. If I covered other neighborhoods, it would be a book.

Covington
Otto’s: This is one of my favorite places for lunch, dinner and brunch. It has a small menu of Southern food, but everything is outstanding. Get the tomato pie for lunch. Otto’s is also one of my contenders for best burger in the city.

Bouquet: Great wine bar and good food made with local ingredients. I love the trout.

Frida 602: A bustling Mexican place that specializes in mezcal and tacos. Get the queso. You’ll thank me.

Cock & Bull: The best fish and chips in town and a draft beer list that is insane (Delirium Tremens on draft – dang).

Goodfella’s Pizza and the Wiseguy Lounge: Downstairs is a small pizzeria with New York style pizza (yes, you can order a slice) and beer. Upstairs is one of the best bourbon bars in the state and a great place to relax.

Commonwealth Bistro: A new Southern food restaurant on Main Street. I’ve only been once but I was blown away by the fried rabbit and biscuit.

Crafts & Vines: One of the friendliest bars in the city. Wine on draft (you read that right). Plus an inventive beer selection.

Old Kentucky Bourbon Bar: The bartenders know me by name here. An astonishing bourbon selection. The patio out back is one of my favorite places to hang out with a crackling fire and a bourbon.

Covington Coffee: Super-friendly family-run place. Great pastries and the best bagels (Lil’s) in the city.

Crepe Cafe: A relatively new shop on Pike Street. A cozy family-run place with really good sweet and savory crepes, plus espresso. One of my favorite places for lunch – it’s two blocks from our shop.

Point Perk: My other favorite coffee shop in town. The hours are limited, but the espresso and chai drinks are fantastic.

Coppin’s in the Hotel Covington: Open less than a year, this hotel is the jewel of the city. It’s less than a block from Braxton Brewing. The restaurant and bar are highly recommended for breakfast, lunch, dinner and brunch. Get the corn fritters, the 16 Bricks bread and… oh just get everything.

Inspirado: Around the corner from Braxton. Eclectic menu. Osso buco and street tacos? Yes please. A very friendly place – lunch, dinner and brunch.

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Pork ho fun at Kung Food.

Amerasia Kung Food: Don’t be fooled by the appearance of this divey-looking Chinese place. People come from all over the city for lunch and dinner. It also has one of the best selections of beer in the city. If you like noodles, get the pork ho fun (and ask them to make it a little extra crispy).

Riverside Korean: Authentic Korean. A karaoke room (yes, we’ve done it). Riverside never disappoints.

House of Grill: Tasty Persian food served up by the friendliest family in the restaurant business.

Keystone Grill: Family-friendly place for lunch, dinner or brunch. The mac and cheese varieties are great.

The Gruff: A pizza place in the shadow of the Roebling bridge. Fantastic pizzas (try the Italian meat pizza or the Margarita) plus local craft beer and one of the most inspiring views in the city.

Whew, Now Cincinnati
I’m going to keep this brief. This blog entry is turning into an opus already. All of these restaurants are less than a mile from the river. I’m also skipping places that are so popular (The Eagle, Bakersfield, Taft Ale House) that you can’t easily get in.

Sotto: The best restaurant in the city. Period. The first time my daughter tried the short rib cappellacci she cried. No lie.

Boca: The big brother to Sotto. A bit fancy, but unforgettable in every respect.

Maplewood: The best breakfast in the city. No question.

Mita’s: Beautiful Spanish restaurant with achingly good paella.

Nada: Upscale Mexican with a fantastic brunch.

Senate Pub: Go early. Poutine and the best hot dog I’ve ever had (brioche bun!).

Krueger’s Tavern: Delicious hamburgers and homemade sausage.

Taste of Belgium: Fried chicken and waffles. Great breakfast. Belgian ale on tap.

Morelein Lager House: A local brewery with a restaurant – the view of the Roebling Bridge and Covington alone is worth the trip.

atavola_img_1818

Sweet pea and bacon pizza at A Tavola.

A Tavola: My favorite pizza in the city. Neapolitan-style. Awesome wagyu-beef meatballs and bacon tapenade. Great wine, beer and cocktails.

Salazar: I vacillate between Salazar and Sotto as my favorite places in the city.

eli_img_1755

Pulled pork sandwich at Eli’s.

Findlay Market & Eli’s: A old open-air market and the pride of Cincinnati. On weekends we walk around, eat whatever smells good and buy sausages (Kroeger meat) for the week. Eli’s is adjacent and it’s my favorite barbecue joint.

OK, that should be enough to keep you fed for one weekend.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Personal Favorites, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

a day of rest......

Accidental Woodworker - Sun, 03/05/2017 - 2:09am
After I got home today from doing OT, I was spent. I did not want to get up to go to work this morning. It was a rare day for me in that I knew I could have rolled over and gone back to sleep.  But to work I went, did my time, came home, and felt like a deflated balloon. Another rare occurrence for me was I couldn't get motivated to do do anything in the shop. I tried a couple of things but gave up on doing anything in shop today.

I did finish this
I got the tequila bottle packed in the box and then packed that in another box.

used some of these foam sheets too
I'm sure the box this will get the snot knocked out of it being shipped so I don't want to rely solely on wood shavings. The wooden box will protect the tequila and the foam will help to keep it immobile.

ready to ship
This is packing box #2 because I forgot to add a few things in the first one. The most important one was a piece of paper with the from and to addresses on it. A lesson learned the hard way and I usually always put the to/from addresses in the box now. Just in case the address on the box goes south somehow. I'll ship this out on monday.

next project
This was to be the lead off batter today but the line up got shuffled. The spice rack and paper towel holder are both done and I don't have any other projects from the wife so this will have to wait now. It's going to be a book rack/shelf. I've made several of them in pine and one in poplar. This one will be walnut and cherry.

this became the lead off batter
All of these irons are loose in a drawer right now. That is not a particularly good way to stow them. Decided to do something about and nothing like the present to fix a potential problem. My first thoughts on fixing will shock regular readers - put them in a box?

4 1/2" chipbreaker
I started this last week and today I finished it. I want to try out the 4 1/2" iron I got from 'Tools from Japan'. I need a chipbreaker to do that.

the chipbreaker screw is iffy
I have two more of these that I can try because this one barely catches. I couldn't screw it in then slip the iron over the chipbreaker. I had to position the chipbreaker on the iron first and then screw it together.

wispy shavings out of the box
I didn't do anything to this iron at all. I didn't strop it or flatten the back neither. I couldn't feel a difference in this iron over the one I had in the plane previously.

sailed right through the knot like it wasn't there
I will hone this iron and round the corners off. It came sharpened at 30° where all my other irons are done at 25° (except on LN iron at 30°). I'm not sure if I'll keep it at 30 or slowly change it over to 25.

it works
This is a 45° template that I have tried to use 3 times already without any success. Today I nailed it. The other times I tried it I used the chisel going straight down and the isn't a lot of real estate to guide the chisel. Today I tried a different approach. I started with a freshly sharpened chisel and I started at the top right corner of the guide. I went with a sweeping motion going from the top diagonally down and form the left to the right. Doing that ensured that the back of the chisel was in contact with both legs of the template.

looks good
it's 45°
I haven't had any opportunities for using this but now it's ready to go.

Stanley #120 block plane
It works and makes nice shavings.

the only hiccup
It's missing it's wooden knob. I haven't bothered to go nutso doing a rehab on this. All I did on it was to sharpen the iron a little. I got this on an auction bid that was included with other things I wanted. I tried to sell this before and didn't get any takers. This I'm offering it up for shipping in a flat rate box which I think is about $6.50. If you want it, the first email yada, yada, yada.........

my rehabbed Stanley 79
I spent a lot of time restoring this. When I got it was covered with rust and rust blooms but it cleaned up nicely. Almost 100% of the nickel is still on it too.

the fences were the worse
I had to use heat to get the screws that hold the fences on off. The shoes were rusted in place and I galled the right hand screw a bit getting it out.

it's clean as a whistle now
the iron beds are clean and pit free
irons
I didn't do anything with the irons and this is the same condition I received them in. They are sharp and make shavings.

body is straight
I bought the LN side rabbet planes and I should have them next week according UPS. I thought about keeping the 79 but I don't see the need for it. I am putting it up for adoption and the fee is $40 including shipping in a flat rate box to the lower 48. The drill is the same as above - the first email yada, yada, yada.........

square
Getting square with hand planes has become an almost given for me now.  I have a friend that is always telling me he can't get square with his planes. He also has a two plugged in jointers and doesn't use his planes as much as I do. I don't have a plug in jointer to fall back on. I have only my planes to get 90 for me.

This hasn't always been the case for me and I've struggled trying to get square edges for many years. I had given up on a lot of attempts and resorted to using my powered jointer. My thoughts on this always go back to the old masters that didn't have the luxury of using a jointer with a plug. They had to plane square or else. It was something they did and it was something I wanted to do.

I think getting square with planes is just a matter of practice. It's like sawing to a line or chiseling dovetails. It is just another skill set that is needed to do hand tool only woodworking. It is only in the last year or so that getting square edges fell into place for me. And I can get it with just about all my bench planes. I still have problems getting square with Lee Valley bevel up jack. I don't use it that often and I don't have good luck correcting for out of square with it neither. I usually have to use the 4 1/2 to fix it.

I really don't know what my technique is, I just know that one day I planed an edge and felt like it was square. When I checked it the edge was square end to end. I seem to be an automatic mode when I plane and I'm sure it is memory and practice paying off.

back to the regularly scheduled TV channel
Scrapped the box idea and now I'm going with sticking them in the drawer.  I need room for 13 irons and I have 15" front to back in the drawer. This layout is for 3/16" grooves and needs only about 9" total length.

#8 iron and chipbreaker
A bit too loose causing the the iron to flop around. I want these to stay in place as I open and close the drawer.

dropped down to 1/8"
This is a strong 1/8". I knifed one of the lines on the waste side. I sawed the walls and cleaned out the waste with a 1/8" chisel.

better fit
It's one frog hair from being snug.

LN irons are loose
4 1/2 iron and chipbreaker
This one is snug and the iron that came from 'Tools from Japan' is tight. That one I have to push down to seat it. It is looking like I am going to have to customize each slot for each iron.

1/8" set up bar
Just realized that I don't have a 1/8" iron for any of my routers. Do they make any that small? I'll be searching for that after this blog is done.

Maybe tomorrow I'll get some woodworking squeezed in and not have another rambling, ping pong adventure like today.

accidental woodworker

trivia corner
Roger Bannister was the first runner to break the 4 minute mile. How long did he hold the world record?
answer - 46 days

Table Trestles-Part 7

Hillbilly Daiku - Sat, 03/04/2017 - 5:35pm

As per my usual, every day after work this week I tried to get in half an hour to an hour of work on the tables.  After a nine or ten-hour day at work you would think I would just come home and relax.  Well that is exactly what I’m doing.  A little wood working is the best way to quiet my mind.  Anyway I made some progress.

Most of my attention this week was focused on getting the first tabletop ready for finish.  I could have just went with the planed surface.  Except for a few troublesome areas, the top was smooth, but a little boring to my eye.  Admittedly, I had planned to treat this top with the uzukuri technique.  Essentially an abraded and burnished finish treatment created with “brushes” of varying coarseness. The abrading action lowers the less dense (early) wood from the harder (late) wood.  Subsequent finer “brushes” further refine, as well as burnish, the surface.  I also used a couple of gouges to further deepen the effect here and there.  The resulting surface is much like polished driftwood.  The technique isn’t difficult, but takes time.  Plus you are never really done.  At some point you just have to stop.

img_0327

Here you see one of the trouble areas with some wild grain.

img_2964

Much better…IMHO.

img_2965

I did a little work on the trestles for this top as well.  If you remember, I had a couple splits that needed repaired.  The repairs worked out fine, but their visibility was wearing on me.  So I broke out my stamping tool and added some texture to the ends of the trestles and followed up with the wood burning tool.

img_0330

img_2968

Since I had the wood burner fired up, I had a little fun with the tops of the trestles.  Very few people will ever see this, but I think it will be a nice surprise for those who do.

img_2971

img_2973

I mounted the top with the carriage bolts and wing nuts that I “aged”.  Two bolts per trestle.  These are 1/2″ bolts and I needed to allow for any expansion and contraction of the top.  To do this I bored 3/4″ holes in the trestles.  Hence the need for a fender washer.  The tabletop received a countersink for the bolt head and a 1/2″ thru hole.  To create the countersink I employed my expansion bit and cleaned up the bottom of the hole with a small router plane.

img_2974

I used a gouge and, you guessed it, the wood burner to ease the entrance and exit edges of the hole.

img_2978

img_2976

img_2979

So the first table is complete and ready for finish.

img_0332

Now onto tabletop number two.

Part 6 Greg Merritt Part 7


Categories: Hand Tools

A Trip to Liberty Tool Company

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Sat, 03/04/2017 - 3:26pm

The thermometer read 1F when I started the car before dawn, and the wind had been rattling the house all night. These minor details didn’t matter one bit, however, as today was the annual Grand Re-Opening of the Liberty Tool Company in Liberty, Maine. Tool pilgrims from all over flock to this place for its reliably well-stocked supply of hand tools, from the common to the esoteric. And every year, after a long winter’s slumber and limited hours, the store re-opens with all-new inventory of picked and reasonably-priced antique goodies. Incredibly, neither Joshua nor I had ever ventured down for this event, but today would change that. Each of us roused our respective eldest boys out of bed (this is a rite-of-passage, after all) and we rendezvoused at a central location to make the drive together just as the sky was getting brighter.

We arrived over an hour before opening, and there were already cars and trucks lining both sides of the road. The system is very simple – there is a clipboard on the door. Arrive early. Write your name down. You get a number. At 8 o’clock, everyone enters in the order that they’ve signed up. However, we were there to document the event, so all we had to do was track down proprietor Skip Brack (who is featured in M&T Issue Two) to let us in. The power of “press credentials”, right?

We strolled the eerily quiet store for a few minutes, nearly overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of… well, just about everything. Hewing axes, cooper’s adzes, dividers, scythes, anvils, auger bits, swords (the boys practically begged to bring home a sword apiece), ceremonial spears (wait, maybe a sword AND a spear!) – you name it, and it could probably be found tucked back in some shelf or drawer. I had my eye on an old French pattern axe, but it wouldn’t have been fair game to grab something before the rightful first customers came through. Gotta play by the rules.

The boys and I moved back to a warm corner, near the big woodstove, where we’d set up a display of Mortise & Tenon Magazine Issues One and Two. Joshua had been busy taking video and photos of the gathering crowd outside. Suddenly, it was time! The doors opened, and in an orderly but very rapid manner the place was packed. Carhartts and wool flannel everywhere, beards and game faces. These folks were on a mission. I was surprised by just how quiet everyone was – the sound of shuffling boots and clinking tools and inaudible mutterings as an item was handled, evaluated, and either tucked into a bag or placed back for the next customer. Men and women began lugging armloads through the aisles. The excitement was thick, and smiles were big. We heard that some folks make the trip from states away to be there for this event – that doesn’t surprise me a bit.

We headed out after many in the initial crowd had made their purchases. It was still hard to move around in there, though! My French axe was gone, no doubt to a happy home, and the shelves were looking just a bit less overloaded. Despite the bitter cold, another Liberty Tool reopening came off as a success – and hopefully, many of those tools that found new owners will be receiving a good honing and tune-up this weekend!

~Mike Updegraff

 

Categories: Hand Tools

A Trip to Liberty Tool Company

The Mortise & Tenon Magazine Blog - Sat, 03/04/2017 - 3:26pm

The thermometer read 1F when I started the car before dawn, and the wind had been rattling the house all night. These minor details didn’t matter one bit, however, as today was the annual Grand Re-Opening of the Liberty Tool Company in Liberty, Maine. Tool pilgrims from all over flock to this place for its reliably well-stocked supply of hand tools, from the common to the esoteric. And every year, after a long winter’s slumber and limited hours, the store re-opens with all-new inventory of picked and reasonably-priced antique goodies. Incredibly, neither Joshua nor I had ever ventured down for this event, but today would change that. Each of us roused our respective eldest boys out of bed (this is a rite-of-passage, after all) and we rendezvoused at a central location to make the drive together just as the sky was getting brighter.

We arrived over an hour before opening, and there were already cars and trucks lining both sides of the road. The system is very simple – there is a clipboard on the door. Arrive early. Write your name down. You get a number. At 8 o’clock, everyone enters in the order that they’ve signed up. However, we were there to document the event, so all we had to do was track down proprietor Skip Brack (who is featured in M&T Issue Two) to let us in. The power of “press credentials”, right?

We strolled the eerily quiet store for a few minutes, nearly overwhelmed by the sheer quantity of… well, just about everything. Hewing axes, cooper’s adzes, dividers, scythes, anvils, auger bits, swords (the boys practically begged to bring home a sword apiece), ceremonial spears (wait, maybe a sword AND a spear!) – you name it, and it could probably be found tucked back in some shelf or drawer. I had my eye on an old French pattern axe, but it wouldn’t have been fair game to grab something before the rightful first customers came through. Gotta play by the rules.

The boys and I moved back to a warm corner, near the big woodstove, where we’d set up a display of Mortise & Tenon Magazine Issues One and Two. Joshua had been busy taking video and photos of the gathering crowd outside. Suddenly, it was time! The doors opened, and in an orderly but very rapid manner the place was packed. Carhartts and wool flannel everywhere, beards and game faces. These folks were on a mission. I was surprised by just how quiet everyone was – the sound of shuffling boots and clinking tools and inaudible mutterings as an item was handled, evaluated, and either tucked into a bag or placed back for the next customer. Men and women began lugging armloads through the aisles. The excitement was thick, and smiles were big. We heard that some folks make the trip from states away to be there for this event – that doesn’t surprise me a bit.

We headed out after many in the initial crowd had made their purchases. It was still hard to move around in there, though! My French axe was gone, no doubt to a happy home, and the shelves were looking just a bit less overloaded. Despite the bitter cold, another Liberty Tool reopening came off as a success – and hopefully, many of those tools that found new owners will be receiving a good honing and tune-up this weekend!

~Mike Updegraff

 

Categories: Hand Tools

‘Roman Workbenches’ Going on Press

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sat, 03/04/2017 - 12:44pm

rw_plate_img_4431

Unless something goes awry, Brian Stuparyk at Steam Whistle Letterpress plans to start printing the pages for “Roman Workbenches” this week. The plates are in. The paper is in. Now it’s just a matter of putting the two together on his Vandercook press.

Once the pages are printed, we’ll truck the results to Massachusetts so the bindery can fold the signatures, sew them and bind them. It’s too soon to tell exactly when the book will be finished and then ship – I’m hoping the process takes another five weeks.

Today I stopped by the Steam Whistle shop in neighboring Newport, Ky., to take some photos of the plates and paper to assure you that we haven’t taken your money and run off to Kansas (that’s really about as far as we could get on that sum).

Brian is a newly minted father and seems still as excited about the job as I am – and I don’t think he’s slept since Monday.

When the press starts rolling, I’ll post some photos and video of the process. It won’t be long now.

— Christopher Schwarz

page_proofs_img_4415 rw_paper_stock_img_4413 vandercook_img_4438

 


Filed under: Roman Workbenches, Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

Jewellery Box from Canada

David Barron Furniture - Sat, 03/04/2017 - 7:22am

Robert from Canada sent me these pictures of his latest project a very nice jewellery box in Canadian white maple and figured walnut from a tree that blew down in Toronto.


He's planning on lining the box which would finish it off nicely.


Categories: Hand Tools

Coming to Town for the Lie-Nielsen Event?

Lost Art Press: Chris Schwarz - Sat, 03/04/2017 - 6:07am

zoo_goat_img_8818

If you are trying to trick your family into traveling to Cincinnati so you can attend the Lie-Nielsen Hand Tool Event at Braxton Brewing on March 10-11, here’s some ammunition.

In this post, let’s talk about the kids’ stuff:

The Ringling Bros. final dates in Cincinnati just happen to be during that weekend. The circus is closing up shop and so this might be your last chance to see it. The performances are at the U.S. Bank Arena in Cincinnati – right across the river from Covington. Details here.

The Cincinnati Museum Center has an exhibit of Viking artifacts (which I really need to get over to see). Lots of swords, a recreation of a Viking ship and additional programming that young Vikings would dig (Viking games). The Cincinnati Children’s Museum is also in the facility, and we spent many long Saturdays there when our kids were young.

If your kids dig fish, penguins and sea life, the Newport Aquarium is a great day trip. The aquarium is at Newport on the Levee, an entertainment district that’s five minutes from the hand tool event. There’s a movie theater, restaurants and other fun stuff for kids there. Also, oddly, Mitchell’s Fish Market is exactly next door to the aquarium. I always wondered….

The Cincinnati Zoo is an outstanding zoo. I can say that because I’ve been dragged to zoos (legal and sketchy) all over the Western world. In addition to seeing all the animals that would like to eat you, there are animals you can pet. The children’s section of the zoo kept our kids occupied for hours so we could fall half-asleep on a bench.

If you have a child who is obsessed with trucks, you can soothe the little savage with a trip to the Cincinnati Fire Museum. It’s downtown – a short hop from Covington.

The Cincinnati Art Museum (free admission!) is another great day trip. For the younger kids, there’s the Rosenthal Education Center, with hands-on stuff to keep little hands occupied between filling diapers. The rest of the museum is great, too, if they happen to take a nap in the stroller.

If you like to warp your children’s minds (like we did), go to the Contemporary Art Center in downtown Cincinnati. You start at the top of the amazing building and work your way down. Our kids were always shocked and amazed and surprisingly curious when we went to the CAC. (There’s a section for kids at the top of the museum, too.) It’s not too freaky – promise. Also, stop by the 21c Museum Hotel next door. It has two floors of art exhibits that are always fun and interesting (our kids still ask to go). There’s lots to eat all around the CAC, but I’ll save that for another post.

Hope this helps.

— Christopher Schwarz


Filed under: Uncategorized
Categories: Hand Tools

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