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An aggregate of many different woodworking blog feeds from across the 'net all in one place!  These are my favorite blogs that I read everyday...

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General Woodworking

Which is more difficult: Being a great musician or being a great woodworker?

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 3:37pm
Take Our Poll (function(d,c,j){if(!d.getElementById(j)){var pd=d.createElement(c),s;pd.id=j;pd.src='https://s1.wp.com/wp-content/mu-plugins/shortcodes/js/polldaddy-shortcode.js';s=d.getElementsByTagName(c)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(pd,s);} else if(typeof jQuery !=='undefined')jQuery(d.body).trigger('pd-script-load');}(document,'script','pd-polldaddy-loader'));

Because I spent many years studying, practicing, and playing music I’ve always compared it to other hobbies and professions on a scale of difficulty. Now that I am a hobby woodworker, I naturally compare woodworking to music. I spent many years playing in working bands, I took many lessons, and many college courses and even with all of my knowledge and experience I know that had I continued on with music I would still have a life time of learning and practicing to go before I could call myself a “master”. I don’t know how good I was honestly. I was good enough to play in bands, to record, and to play at most of the bars and clubs in the Philadelphia area. I was good enough to get paid for what I did, and I was good enough to teach it. Yet, I also know that there were countless thousands who were/are better than I ever was or would be. That fact never bothered me much, as I can say the same about woodworkers.

As far as the poll is concerned, I’m not looking for any one particular answer because I don’t have one myself. I honestly don’t know if music is more difficult than woodworking. This I can say, at my musical height, I practiced nearly every day at least a few hours, I took two lessons per week, and I generally practiced with one band or another two or three times a week. If I woodworked now as much as I practiced and played music then I would be a far, far better woodworker than I ever was a musician. Yet there may be woodworkers out there who are fantastic without having to work at it just like there are some musicians who are so naturally gifted that it comes easily to them without much work. I don’t believe it-music and woodworking both require muscle memory, which is something that requires practice no matter what your natural talents- but it could be true.

So if I had to choose I would say that being a great musician is more difficult than being a great woodworker. The reason I say that is because I know there are thousands of “weekend warrior” woodworkers who make world-class, professional level furniture. I don’t believe there are thousands of hobby musicians who are making world class music in their basements on the weekends. I’m sure there are exceptions to that, but I personally believe the ratio by-far favors hobby woodworkers. Still, that’s just the opinion of one person, and if anybody out there has any feedback I’d appreciate it. Thanks.


Categories: General Woodworking

What Do You Think of this Style of Furniture?

MVFlaim Furnituremaker - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 2:09pm

Having a woodworking blog, I know that a lot of people who follow my blog are also woodworkers. And if I know woodworkers, it is that they love wood grain. So much so, that the whole idea of painting a piece of furniture that they make is often considered sacrilegious. However, I also know that many women who usually buy furniture for their home would rather have a piece of furniture that goes with their décor. Beautiful wood grain is something many of them don’t even think about when picking out a piece for their home. So I decided to do a little nonscientific poll to see what people think of the following piece of furniture.

This is a buffet my wife bought at an auction. She wanted to paint the base, but leave the top a natural wood tone. She sanded the top and oiled it with hemp oil. Some people call this type of furniture restyle Shabby Chic. I’m not sure if this is technically Shabby Chic or French Country or whatever. My wife calls it Elegant Farm House style.

Below you can see some of the detail of the wood after it’s been painted. To me, the architectural details of the moldings stick out a little more and are not muddled in the wood grain when the piece has been distressed. But what do you think?

buffet

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Senco is Coming to Popular Woodworking Magazine

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 1:30pm

Senco is Coming to Popular Woodworking Magazine

On May 7, 2014, we’re going to give you a chance to act like an editor for Popular Woodworking Magazine for the evening. That’s right, we’re going to let you (and a limited number of other folks) come into the workshop here at the magazine and test some of the newest tools from Senco. Can you tell me more about what’s going on? We’re hosting the event for Senco to […]

The post Senco is Coming to Popular Woodworking Magazine appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

I Had Heard Rumors…

The Furniture Record - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 1:26pm

but I chose not to believe them. Just too horrible to consider.

But when faced with the ugly reality, I was forced to admit it must be true.

Dovetailed particle board!

What were they thinking?

Staring at if for a few terrifying minutes, I believe it cannot be considered “best practice”.

I’m all verklempt. I can’t go on anymore today.

On the lighter side, I did find another gout rocker.

Still just in North Carolina. Never found one in Oregon.

Still just in North Carolina. Never found one in Oregon.


Swill basket making course

Steve Tomlin Crafts - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 11:35am
Swill basket makingIn today's internet world it's a treat to find a craft that's particular to one region and still being carried out in the same way as it has been for hundreds of years. Last week I had the chance to learn some of the skills of a traditional Cumbrian craft for myself. Continue reading
Categories: General Woodworking

A Poll: Woodworking With Kids

The Kilted Woodworker - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 10:51am

I don’t often ask for input from my blog readers as I’m fairly adept at rambling on without much guidance.

However, I’ve received several comments and e-mails (all positive) regarding my last few posts on woodworking with kids and am thinking about a more structured approach to the topic. Before I dive too heavily into it, I thought it might be a good idea to gather a little information and figure out how much interest there is in the subject and the best direction (if there is one) I should take in discussing it.

Thus, I have a short poll for you and a request. Please take just a few seconds (seriously, like 10 seconds!) to give me some feedback, if you don’t mind. Pick as many of the below choices as you want. If you care to expound upon your vote, feel free to leave a comment in the blog post’s comment section.

Take Our Poll (function(d,c,j){if(!d.getElementById(j)){var pd=d.createElement(c),s;pd.id=j;pd.src='http://s1.wp.com/wp-content/mu-plugins/shortcodes/js/polldaddy-shortcode.js';s=d.getElementsByTagName(c)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(pd,s);} else if(typeof jQuery !=='undefined')jQuery(d.body).trigger('pd-script-load');}(document,'script','pd-polldaddy-loader'));

Cheers,

TKW


Categories: General Woodworking

Preview – June 2014 PWM & ‘Extras’ Instructions

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 8:39am

Preview – June 2014 PWM & 'Extras' Instructions

The June issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine mails to subscribers (both print and digital) on or around this Thursday. We’re short a managing editor at the moment and extras fall into the purview of that role, but through a combination of caffeine, little sleep and unconquerable anal-retentiveness, I’ve managed to get almost all of the extras posted in time (and the few missing items will be posted later this week). […]

The post Preview – June 2014 PWM & ‘Extras’ Instructions appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Designer’s Alphabet, Y is for ………..

Design Matters - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 5:09am

 

Yorkshire chair with a crested back. (Bonhams)

Yorkshire chair with a crested back. (Bonhams)

 

 

durer-latin-yorkshire chair, a regional chair form produced in the latter half of the 17th century in Britain. More broadly they fall under the umbrella of Charles II oak chairs (1660-1685). They were also produced in nearby Derbyshire, and sometimes refereed to as Derbyshire chairs.They had a few features that set them apart from the earlier Jacobean chair designs and hinted at some of the changes to chairmaking in the coming 18th century. Yorkshire chairs

An arcade is a row of arches supported by colunms.

An arcade is a row of arches supported by columns. (Bonhams)

departed from the Jacobean perpendicular chair backs with a solid plank splat, and moved to a more open back that tilted slightly to conform to the human frame. The open backs were often crested like the crown of a hill, or arcaded with a series of arches supported by small columns. To my eye the proportions are lighter than the earlier chair designs from the 17th century, perhaps a nod towards things to come in the chairmaking world in Georgian era in the 18th century.

 

Note: Thanks to Jack Plane for helping me track down some information on these chairs. I originally began looking for an American “York” chair. All roads came to nothing with only one poor example far removed from these English chairs. Sort of a dogs breakfast, cobbled together by committee. If you have a photo of an American “York” chair, pass it along and I’ll post it.

 

George R. Walker


VIDEO: Hand Cut Dovetails Part 7: Cut the Tails

Wood and Shop - Mon, 04/14/2014 - 3:05am

VIDEO 7/15 of Joshua Farnsworth’s free hand cut dovetail video series shows how to cut out the tails with a dovetail saw.

This is a very detailed tutorial designed to teach beginners how to become expert at dovetailing by hand. It is offered as a free resource to encourage the revival of traditional woodworking.

hand-cut-dovetails

This detailed video series was inspired by a 5 day class that I took from Roy Underhill and Bill Anderson: world-renowned experts on traditional woodworking with hand tools.

Which traditional hand tools should you buy?

If you need advice on which hand tools to buy (and not buy), then definitely read my 13 category buying guide article: “Which Hand Tools Do You need for Traditional Woodworking?”

Shortcuts to Dovetail Videos 1-15:

Barrel Revival

She Works Wood - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 6:47pm
Look what followed us home from the outdoor market to day.  I love, love, love supporting my local woodworkers and I really get jazzed when I can support a young who is just starting out and doing something cool/creative. Keith Forsyth over at Barrel Revival made this chair from old oak barrels staves used in […]
Categories: General Woodworking

what a weekend it was…

Peter Follansbee, joiner's notes - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 5:41pm

Winter is perhaps really over here – it better be, I put my hat & scarves away.  

The day started out in the woods, looking for birds. Daniel & I saw many, he counted 18 species; but we only got a few shots of them. 

 

wood ducks

wood ducks

 

bluebird

bluebird

 

turkey

they don’t call this a turkey for nothing

Back home we ended up with spoon carving lesson # something-0r-other. I have to teach a bunch of students at Lie-Nielsen next month, so started practicing with Daniel. His knife work is excellent, given his strength.  (the May class is full, so we added one as soon as we could – which means October! here’s the link 

http://www.lie-nielsen.com/weekend-workshop/1-ww-pf-sc14

 

 

DF grip 1

 

DF grip 2

 

Working one-on-one meant I got some carving in too. 

pair of spoon carvers

 

Meanwhile Rose did the 19th-century-Swedish-immigrant-in-the-garden routine. All around a busy day here. 

rose as immigrant gardner

 

When one of the household  is a knitter and the other is a basket-maker, that means knitting baskets. I don’t get to make baskets much anymore, but have several that have lingered for quite a while. I finished this one the other day.  It’s a form I have only done once before; a double-swing-handle design. Basket is ash, handles, rims, and feet are hickory. Lashing is hickory bark. 

knitting basket

inside basket

basket skids

 

Then Daniel went in the house & started a self-portrait carving his spoon. Sometimes these pictures never get done, like my baskets. So I am posting it now in case it’s an orphan drawing. 

df self portrait as carver 001

 

Now onto another subject. If you’re inclined to help support some young people doing what they love, remember Eleanor Underhill? Maybe you know her father? In addition to illustrating Roy’s most recent Woodwright book, she did some drawings for mine & Alexander’s Joint Stool book – but her main gig is music – and she’s part of a trio making “heartfelt country soul” – they’re using Kickstarter to fund their next album. I’m in. 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/underhillrose/underhill-roses-best-album-yet

 

 


Plant stand continues

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 5:04pm

Something extremely disappointing happened to me last week that I didn’t mention on the blog. While prepping the wood for my plant stand I discovered that a good portion of it wasn’t usable. There was some rot, and bad checks, and worst of all twist. Rather than throw it all in the trash; it’s still Walnut; I salvaged everything I could and stacked it neatly on the small rack I have in my garage. In fact, I had planned on taking a photo of it for the blog and seeing if anybody could come up with a good project for it. But with the Walnut not an option I wasn’t too sure what to do about the plant stand that my wife has been asking me to make-I really don’t want to purchase any material at the moment, and at the same time I don’t usually keep much laying around. So I did some searching in my scrap pile and found that I had enough clear Fir to make the stand legs, and bottom stretchers, and I had enough clear Pine to make the top stretchers as well as the table top itself. I still need a board for the bottom shelf, but I will worry about that when the stand is ready to be assembled.

Today saw the most progress of any other during the project. I got all 16 mortises laid out, the tenons are all sawn, and the top is finished. The tenons were the most time consuming part of the day. I used the table saw to define the cheeks of the tenons, but I sawed them with a hand saw. I’m not sure exactly why I do it this way, because there really is no advantage one way or the other, but it’s always how I’ve done it, and it seems to work. For accuracy I saw the tenons two boards at a time, which seems to help make sawing easier, and it speeds things up a little. With all sixteen tenons sawn I started on the top.

To make the top I glued up two boards, using the jointer plane to make a tight glue joint. I don’t know why, but when I did the glue up last week I had some trouble getting a good joint. The iron was certainly sharp enough, but the board did not want to plane properly. In any event, I did eventually manage to get a tight joint, and today I used the smoothing plane to clean it up. Before I went any further, I used the table saw and cross cut sled to produce the finished size: 16×16. I then planed the edges clean and used the random orbit sander, 220 grit, for a final light pass on the top.

The last operation of the day was laying out the mortises. Before I started I marked both the legs and stretchers with a cabinet makers triangle just so I didn’t screw up royally. To mark the mortises I used the tenons of the stretchers to size them, and then used a marking gauge to lay them out. Because I don’t have a mortising machine, I will chop them out with a mortising chisel. I suppose I could use a router, but on a soft wood like Fir the chisel will do just fine. So by next weekend the joinery should all be ready to go. I will only need to at the beading and the stand will be ready for assembly.

At first I was a little worried about using Pine and Fir together, but I think they will do fine. Both are softwoods and the material is nice and clear with no warp or knots of any kind. I wish I could use all Fir but I just didn’t have enough. I had even considered buying a 2×8 and milling the material from that, but that could be hit or miss, and I doubt that I could find a piece that was clear enough to make furniture from, at least not without searching through hundreds of boards to find it. I may regret that choice when I stain this project. I’m hoping that the gel stain that I used for my end tables does a good job of evening out two slightly dissimilar woods. I will have to do a test run at first, and maybe use some conditioner on the wood. If I don’t post any photos, you all will know it turned out.

marking the tenons

marking the tenons

sawing the bottom stretcher tenons

sawing the bottom stretcher tenons

Trying to be precise, and I need to shave

Trying to be precise, and I need to shave

Set up for sawing the cheeks

Set up for sawing the cheeks


Categories: General Woodworking

Plant stand continues

The Slightly Confused Woodworker - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 5:04pm

Something extremely disappointing happened to me last week that I didn’t mention on the blog. While prepping the wood for my plant stand I discovered that a good portion of it wasn’t usable. There was some rot, and bad checks, and worst of all twist. Rather than throw it all in the trash; it’s still Walnut; I salvaged everything I could and stacked it neatly on the small rack I have in my garage. In fact, I had planned on taking a photo of it for the blog and seeing if anybody could come up with a good project for it. But with the Walnut not an option I wasn’t too sure what to do about the plant stand that my wife has been asking me to make-I really don’t want to purchase any material at the moment, and at the same time I don’t usually keep much laying around. So I did some searching in my scrap pile and found that I had enough clear Fir to make the stand legs, and bottom stretchers, and I had enough clear Pine to make the top stretchers as well as the table top itself. I still need a board for the bottom shelf, but I will worry about that when the stand is ready to be assembled.

Today saw the most progress of any other during the project. I got all 16 mortises laid out, the tenons are all sawn, and the top is finished. The tenons were the most time consuming part of the day. I used the table saw to define the cheeks of the tenons, but I sawed them with a hand saw. I’m not sure exactly why I do it this way, because there really is no advantage one way or the other, but it’s always how I’ve done it, and it seems to work. For accuracy I saw the tenons two boards at a time, which seems to help make sawing easier, and it speeds things up a little. With all sixteen tenons sawn I started on the top.

To make the top I glued up two boards, using the jointer plane to make a tight glue joint. I don’t know why, but when I did the glue up last week I had some trouble getting a good joint. The iron was certainly sharp enough, but the board did not want to plane properly. In any event, I did eventually manage to get a tight joint, and today I used the smoothing plane to clean it up. Before I went any further, I used the table saw and cross cut sled to produce the finished size: 16×16. I then planed the edges clean and used the random orbit sander, 220 grit, for a final light pass on the top.

The last operation of the day was laying out the mortises. Before I started I marked both the legs and stretchers with a cabinet makers triangle just so I didn’t screw up royally. To mark the mortises I used the tenons of the stretchers to size them, and then used a marking gauge to lay them out. Because I don’t have a mortising machine, I will chop them out with a mortising chisel. I suppose I could use a router, but on a soft wood like Fir the chisel will do just fine. So by next weekend the joinery should all be ready to go. I will only need to at the beading and the stand will be ready for assembly.

At first I was a little worried about using Pine and Fir together, but I think they will do fine. Both are softwoods and the material is nice and clear with no warp or knots of any kind. I wish I could use all Fir but I just didn’t have enough. I had even considered buying a 2×8 and milling the material from that, but that could be hit or miss, and I doubt that I could find a piece that was clear enough to make furniture from, at least not without searching through hundreds of boards to find it. I may regret that choice when I stain this project. I’m hoping that the gel stain that I used for my end tables does a good job of evening out two slightly dissimilar woods. I will have to do a test run at first, and maybe use some conditioner on the wood. If I don’t post any photos, you all will know it turned out.

marking the tenons

marking the tenons

sawing the bottom stretcher tenons

sawing the bottom stretcher tenons

Trying to be precise, and I need to shave

Trying to be precise, and I need to shave

Set up for sawing the cheeks

Set up for sawing the cheeks


Categories: General Woodworking

3 Accepted Foot-to-Case Connections

Woodworker's Edge - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 4:34pm

Last week, after I professed that everyone should have a spindle sander, A few readers asked how I used a spindle sander as a thickness sander. It turns out that I have posted that technique, but it was inside another post. Here’s a link to that post; you’ll find the spindle sander being used to thin ebony string about halfway down the post.

Entertainment_Center copyOn to the next topic: How to attach feet to your case. Of course, there are a few ways to get feet on your cases. There are three methods I generally use on most every case. The first is to attach the feet directly to the bottom of the case, a second method is to rout the top edge of the joined feet and install a plate through which screws affix the assembled unit to the case bottom and the third method is to attach feet to a frame then attach the frame to the case and use a transition molding to cover the through dovetails where the case bottom joins the sides. I mention other methods, because I’ve built a couple of chest – full-size and spice boxes – from Chester County where the feet were attached directly to stiles of the frame and panels sides. While this is not commonplace, it, along with other methods, is sometimes done.

To attach feet directly to the case, I begin by installing a molding to which the feet are glued. You wouldn’t think that you could assemble feet to a molding and that would be strong enough to hold everything for 200 years. IMG_1590Of course, you would be correct. What really holds the feet to the case are  glue blocks. These blocks also carry the bulk of the load of your chest. On the case I’m currently at work on, the thickness of the feet allows about an 1/8″ of the feet to lap onto the case itself. Then, with the glue blocks in place, the weight of the case is divided on the actual feet and on the glue blocks – the vertical block holds the weigh while the two horizontal blocks keep the assembled foot attached.

The next method is a bit more work. And the added plate makes the connection easier, but not necessarily any stronger. After the two foot pieces are joined via miters, I rout a small lip on the inside of the feet using a rabbeting router bit to which I attach a thin plate. PlateThe SketchUp drawing at the left shows how the plate fits to the feet; a thin bead of glue and brads secure the plate to the feet. The assembled unit is then screwed directly to the case bottom with the unit sticking out in front of the case. The look is completed by wrapping a molding around the case. An example of this type of connection is seen in the opening photo, although you cannot see the plate. That’s by design. As you see in the drawing, the cutout for the plate does not blow through the end of the foot.

The last method – the option that I find the most used as I look back at furniture I’ve built throughout the years – is to attach the feet to a base frame which is then attached to the case. Foot&Frame3I used this method on the Pennsylvania blanket chests in the August 2009 issue of Popular Woodworking Magazine (#177) and the Serpentine chest from issue #195 (February 2012). As you can see in the right-hand photo, the same idea of glue blocks is used – mainly for reinforcement in this case. The frame is attached to the front of the chest with screws, but the remaining frame is nailed to the case bottom to allow for seasonal adjustments. The look is then completed with a transition molding.

These are three good methods used to attach feet to cases. There are pros and cons to each, as there is with any technique used in woodworking. Whenever you here, “This is the only way to do it,  run in the opposite direction. You have choices.

Build Something Great!

Glen

 


Categories: General Woodworking

Stupid!

Kees - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 12:51pm
Being in a hurry, not clamping down stuff. While cleaning out a joint, my chisel slipped right into my thumb. The chisel was sharp....


Stupid! The damage isn't too bad, just a fleshwound. But this easilly takes a week to cure.

Categories: General Woodworking

Coolest Machine Ever!

The Barn on White Run - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 7:49am

IMG_5484

While touring the Krohn Conservatory in Cincinnati last week we encountered, well I encountered, “machine lust.”  The staff was constructing a new exhibit in one of the conservatory halls, and there was a young fellow using this machine.  Given the tasks awaiting me at the homestead over the coming years of morphing fully into my emergent status as an Appalachian American, where the main crop is rocks, it seems a perfect fit.  That, and a bush hog.  Yep, I think one of these is nearly obligatory.

Now if I can persuade the CFO…

VIDEO: Hand Cut Dovetails Part 6: Mark the Tail Angles

Wood and Shop - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 3:05am

VIDEO 6/15 of Joshua Farnsworth’s free hand cut dovetail video series shows how to mark the angles of the tails on the board faces.

This is a very detailed tutorial designed to teach beginners how to become expert at dovetailing by hand. It is offered as a free resource to encourage the revival of traditional woodworking.

hand-cut-dovetails

This detailed video series was inspired by a 5 day class that I took from Roy Underhill and Bill Anderson: world-renowned experts on traditional woodworking with hand tools.

Which traditional hand tools should you buy?

If you need advice on which hand tools to buy (and not buy), then definitely read my 13 category buying guide article: “Which Hand Tools Do You need for Traditional Woodworking?”

Shortcuts to Dovetail Videos 1-15:

Senco & Pizza

Popular Woodworking Editors Blog - Sun, 04/13/2014 - 3:00am

Senco, pizza and Popular Woodworking Magazine. All I can add, at the moment, is May 7th, 2014. Stay tuned; details to come. You might want to check out this little video. —Chuck Bender  

The post Senco & Pizza appeared first on Popular Woodworking Magazine.

Categories: General Woodworking

Yeah, But What Is It?

The Furniture Record - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 9:50pm

They called it a 19th century Yellow Pine Lidded Storage Box. Accurate but not the whole story.

The local auction a few days back was a bit of a disappointment. I had high hopes for the other auction house at their Friday night auction. Unfortunately, this week, theirs wasn’t much better. At least from my perspective. Some might be thrilled.

Only a few things of interest. There is this one piece that defied an easy explanation. It is a yellow pine lidded storage box. But why does it take this form? I want to know the rest of the story. Let’s start with a look at the box in question.

Yellow pine lidded storage box, or is it?

Yellow pine lidded storage box, or is it?

Note the staple(?) on the side near the bottom. There is one on the other side as well. Was this an attachment point?

Here is the lidded part.

The lid, no hinges. Two battens hold the lid in place.

The lid, no hinges. Two battens hold the lid in place.

With a forged hasp.

Hand forged hasp. Can't order this one from a catalog.

Hand forged hasp. Can’t order this one from a catalog.

This view let’s you see the kerfed and rounded end. (Kerfing is placing a series of parallel saw cuts on the back of a board to allow it to bend.

Kerfed board wrapping the round end. Lots of nails.

Kerfed board wrapping the round end. Lots of nails.

Full 3/4" sides wrapped with 1/4" to 3/8" wood.

Full 3/4″ sides wrapped with 1/4″ to 3/8″ wood.

This interior view really shows the kerf cuts.

See the kerfs?  Makes bending without heat possible.

See the kerfs? Makes bending without heat possible.

And we need the top view.

The top view. Lots of nails.

The top view. Lots of nails.

Let me throw in this bonus tilt-top table. It is a full table and not a candle stand.

A bit rough but serviceable.

A bit rough but serviceable.

What makes this one interesting is the feet.

Would you call it a stylized talon? Click for an alternate view.

Would you call it a stylized talon? Click for an alternate view.

And the obligatory dovetail shot.

Less than satisfying. Might be machine cut

Less than satisfying. Might be machine cut

Not my favorite ever.


Last Week’s Spoons Finished

The Literary Workshop Blog - Sat, 04/12/2014 - 6:44pm

Last week, I had roughed out some spoons from cherry and then set them aside to dry a little bit.  Last night, I finished shaping them with a spokeshave and smoothed them out with a card scraper.  This afternoon, I sanded and finished them.

Cherry Spoons 4-2014 - - 1 Cherry Spoons 4-2014 - - 2

The wood did twist a little as it dried, so I’m glad I left the handles thick enough to make adjustments to the handles.  There was no checking or cracking to speak of, which was a relief.  I’m also glad I was able to capture some of the natural curves of the wood in the handles.

I should point out that the three oddly-shaped spoons on the left represent my latest attempts to carve spoons Sloyd-style from some mystery wood.  It looks a bit like soft maple, but I don’t think it is, as the wood came from across the street, and maples don’t grow widely here.  It’s also significantly softer than soft maple.

Not counting the wait-time between coats of finish, those eight cherry spoons probably took about 5-6 hours from start to finish.  I’m pleased with how they turned out.


Tagged: cherry, wood spoon, wooden spoons

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